1875 Norway Census
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1875 Norway Census
1,834,978 records
The 1875 Norway census is important as it gives genealogists a snapshot of Norway’s residents shortly before the start of the largest wave of Norwegian emigration to have ever occurred and the unusually long time period before the next national census was conducted. This emigration wave happened between 1879 and 1893 when over a quarter of a million emigrants left Norway for overseas countries. The next national census conducted in Norway occurred sixteen years later in 1891. Each record typically contains the person’s name, residence, position within the family, gender, marital status, occupation, birth year, and birthplace. This collection is provided through cooperation with the National Archives of Norway.<br><br>The Norway censuses contain information about all persons who lived in Norway on a specific date in a specific year. The 1875 census was officially conducted on December 31, 1875 and was the first census in Norway to record any birthdate information rather than age. Additionally, individuals were asked to report their permanent residence and any temporary residence at the time of the census. Records from the 1875 census are known to have been lost from Hattfjelldal Parish in Nordland county. Additionally, the records of sailors and seamen collected in the 1875 census are not yet available. The county names in this collection follow the new county (fylke) names adopted in 1919.
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Fridtjof NansenAker, Akerhus, Norway
Fridtjof Nansen (aka “Frithjof”, 1861-1930) was a polar explorer, scientist, statesman, and recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Nansen was a vocal proponent of ending Norway’s union with Sweden and helped negotiate the treaty that guaranteed Norway’s independence. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1922 for his work on behalf of displaced victims of the First World War.