1940 Denmark Census
3,950,453 records
Change category or collection
Name
Birth date
Residence
Add details
Keywords
More
Match all terms exactly
Clear form
Search in 1940 Denmark Census
Name
Birth date
Residence
Add details
Keywords
More
Clear form
CollectionDescriptionImage
1940 Denmark Census
3,950,453 records
The 1940 Denmark Census was conducted on November 5, 1940 and provides a glimpse into the lives of the citizens of Denmark at the start of World War II. Every individual within the household at the time of the census, whether family, visitor, or employee was enumerated. Each record contains information about the specific person’s given and family names, gender, residence, birth date, birth place, marital status, marriage date, and their relationship to the head of household.<br><br>Additional information can be found on the images including profession, education level, and disability (hearing and vision impairment). The census was the only population registration taken in Denmark during World War II, the previous census was collected in 1930 and the following census in 1950.<br><br><p>Following the German invasion on April 9, 1940, the government of Denmark faced an impossible situation. Unable to mount a reasonable defense, and facing certain annihilation by the German army, Denmark capitulated with little resistance. As a result of their quick surrender, and Denmark’s strong agricultural industry, Adolf Hitler considered Denmark a protectorate and allowed the Danish government to retain most of its autonomy. Critically, the police and judiciary remained under Danish control and King Christian X remained on the throne, becoming a symbol of resistance for the Danish people. While relations with the German government were strained, local and national affairs proceeded on as normally as possible and the Danish government continued with the planned census in November.</p><br><p>The Faroe Islands, which had the status as a proper county of Denmark in 1940, and Greenland, a tightly controlled Danish colony do not appear to have participated in the 1940 Denmark Census due to their individual wartime statuses. Both of these territories were considered of high strategic and military value during World War II. The British occupied the Faroe Islands just four days following the German invasion of Denmark in April 1940 to prevent these important North Atlantic islands from becoming German military outposts. After the German invasion of Denmark the United States exerted tremendous diplomatic pressure with the Canadians and British to hold Greenland as a neutral and American protectorate which lasted until the United States entered the war in December 1941.</p><br><p>The majority of the 1940 census information was recorded by individual householders, not government census workers. This is reflected in the images as you will notice that each householder filled out their own census packet, enumerating every individual currently residing in their home. Householders filling out the census forms themselves leads to more variation in how the information was recorded, particularly in residence fields.</p><br><p>Users should note that the Danish administrative jurisdictions of parish municipalities, market towns, and counties were extensively restructured and consolidated in 1970 as part of the “1970 Danish Municipal Reform”. This census uses the historical administrative jurisdictions in place in 1940.</p><br><a href="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/55/Danmarks_administrative_inddeling_1945.png" target="">Danmarks administrative inddeling 1945</a>
Related record categories:
Sample record
sample record image
Peter Vilhelm GlobCopenhagen, Denmark
Peter Vilhelm Glob, known as P.V. Glob, was a famous Danish archaeologist. He was the director of the National Museum in Copenhagen as well as the Director of General Museums and Antiquities for all of Denmark. He was very engaged in the archaeology of the Middle East where he lead a number of scientific expeditions.