Ellender (Ellen) Elizabeth Bird (Pierce)

Born:1795 In:  Cherokee Nation (North Carolina)
Died:1825 (at age ‎~30‏)In:  Smythe Co., Va
Info
Events
Timeline

Immediate family

Moses Arthur Pierce
Her husband
Thomas Pierce
Her son
Rachel Pierce (Frost)
Her daughter
Alexander Wilson Pierce
Her son
Jefferson Pierce
Her son
Andrew Jackson Pierce
Her son
Rufus Kincannon Pierce
Her son
Lucinda Pierce (Johnson)
Her daughter
<Private> Pierce (Matheny)
Her child

Biography

The following information was given to me by Thomas Hendry

Ellender was a very young lady when she married Moses Pierce and left home. It is said that she was born in North Carolina in what at that time was the largest part of the Cherokee Nation, before all the people were removed to the Oklahoma Indian Territory. Moses and Ellen, as she was called, moved quite a lot as records show. First to Tennessee and then back to North Carolina, Anson County, and finally to Smythe County, Virginia (where she passed away some say at the birth of their last child). Her grave is next to that of her husband, Moses, and it has no names or dates on it. Her daughter, Rachel, married James Frost in 1824 in Smythe Co., Va. and lived there until they moved to Carroll Co., VA. Their first son, Simeon Frost, married Louvinia Lineberry in 1849 and their daughter Alverta Frost married Thomas Carson Whittington in 1877 in Carroll Co., VA. This information has been handed down in the family for many years The Bird family name appears in the North Carolina Cherokee records between 1880 and 1820 six different times and places. But no connection is found as to which ones were Ellender's family.

From the earliest records in America the area of western Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Kentucky was the Cherokee Nation. These people were as civilized as the new settlers that arrived beginning in 1607. They were farmers, planters and hunters, who lived in large homes very much like the new arrivals did. There were also some that were slave holders when this was happening in the country. And after the Cherokee people learned to co-exist with the new settlers, many intermarried with the white families. This was very common around the time of the Revolutionary War and up until the time of Andrew Jackson as President. This is the time of relocation as they called it. When gold was discovered in small areas of the country around the Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee borders. At this time the government confiscated the farms and all large areas that belonged to the native people.

During this very difficult time period those young ladies of native descent that were married to the white settlers did not let it be known that they were from the Cherokees because if they had, they would have been sent west to the new Indian Territory that was first Arkansas and later n Oklahoma Territory. This is what, today, causes such difficulty in finding information on any families or ancestors for them. That is why today only among family records are any mention of this ancestry in existence with almost no exception.

There exists in the records of the Eastern Cherokee Nation, the listing of Bird family names in 1817, 1835 and 1848 rolls. Now no connection to Ellender Bird has ever been established using this information, because of the reasons listed above. These rolls are said to cover the areas of North Carolina where she was said to have been born. The exact dates have never really been found but only estimated as to be between 1790 and 1795 as she was a very young lady when she married Moses Pierce in 1807. There is still very much hard work left to clear this up and set the record straight.

The following information was given to me by Thomas Hendry

Ellender was a very young lady when she married Moses Pierce and left home. It is said that she was born in North Carolina in what at that time was thwe larges part of the Cherokee Nation, before all the people were removed to the Oklahoma Indian Territory. Moses and Ellen, as she was called, moved quite a lot as records show. First to Tennessee and then back to North Carolina, Anson County, and finally to Smythe County, Virginia (where she passed away some say at the birth of their last child). Her grave is next to that of her husband, Moses, and it has no names or dates on it. Her daughter, Rachel, married James Frost in 1824 in Smythe Co., Va. and lived there until they moved to Carroll Co., VA. Their first son, Simeon Frost, married Louvinia Lineberry in 1849 and their daughter Alverta Frost married Thomas Carson Whittington in 1877 in Carroll Co., VA. This information has been hadned down in the family for many years The Bird family name appears in the North Carolina Cherokee records between 1880 and 1820 six different times and places. But no connection is found as to which ones were Ellender's family.

From the earliest records in America the area of western Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Kentucky was the Cherokee Ntion. These people were as civilized as the new settlers that arrived beginning in 1607. They were farmers, planters and hunters, who lived in large homes very much like the new arrivals did. There were also some that were slave holders when this was happening in the country. And after the Cherokee people learned to co-exist with the new settlers, many intermarried with the white families. This was very common around the time of the Revolutionary War and up until the time of Andrew Jackson as President. This is the time of relocation as they called it. When gold was discovered in small areas of the country around the Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee borders. At this time the government confiscated the farms and all large areas that belonged to the native people.

During this very difficult time period those young ladies of native descent that were married to the white settlers did not let it be known that they were from the Cherokees because if they had, they would have been sent west to the new Indian Territory that was first Arkansas and later n Oklahoma Territory. This is what, today, causes such difficulty in finding information on any families or ancestors for them. That is why today only among family records are any mention of this ancestry in existence with almost no exception.

There exists in the records of the Eastern Cherokee Nation, the listing of Bird family names in 1817, 1835 and 1848 rolls. Now no connection to Ellender Bird has ever been established using this information, because of the reasons listed above. These rolls are said to cover the areas of North Carolina where she was said to have been born. The exact dates have never really been found but only estimated as to be between 1790 and 1795 as she was a very young lady when she married Moses Pierce in 1807. There is still very much hard work left to clear this up and set the record straight.

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