John Coningham Sterling

Born:July 20 1806 In:  Kames Castle on the Isle of Bute
Died:Sep 18 1844 (at age 38)In:  Ventnor, Isle of Wight, England, United Kingdom
Info
Events
Timeline

Photos

View album 

Immediate family

Susannah Sterling (born Barton)
His wife
Edward Coningham Sterling, "Teddy"
His son
Anna Charlotte Sterling
His daughter
Katherine Susan "Kate" Ross (born Sterling)
His daughter
Julia Maria Sterling
His daughter
Major-General John Barton Sterling
His son
Hester Isabella Sterling
His daughter
Captain Edward ""Vetus", and "the Thunderer"" Sterling
His father
Hester Sterling (born Coningham)
His mother
Anthony Coningham Sterling
His brother
Hester Sterling
His sister
Edward Sterling
His brother
Robert Sterling
His brother
Captain James ""the Knight of Snowdon"" Fitzjames, RN
Half brother
Elizabeth Sterling
His sister
Catherine Hester Elizabeth Sterling
His sister
    

Source citations

Date: Dec 14 2012
Citation text:
Added by confirming a Smart Match
Confidence: Direct and primary evidence
Date: Sep 23 1844
Citation text:

London Observer
Date: Sep 23 1844
Publication: London, Middlesex, United Kingdom
Text: "...The ledoubts were taken with the bayonet, the enemy having 102 men killed, their colours taken from theiu, and their cannon »piked. The next day we «lestroyed their works, and cari itid away theirttrms ... »spnpeM i(i,iani a ciirre.itlv helievt.1 nport that her Majesty 8 brig Kapid, Ilf ten failure, with death by li.-iui; w ill.-d in alive. This puiii-hm-ot con- i is -..nd, i- to !rie an intervi ..."

Confidence: Direct and primary evidence
Date: Sep 19 1844
Citation text:

London St James Chronicle Whiteltall And General Evening Post
Date: Sep 19 1844
Publication: London, Middlesex, United Kingdom
Text: "..., on Àtnrdy, the 14th inst., the Rev. William Jones, Rector of • Scarthoj in Lincolnshire, arid of Lianrillo, in Breconshire.—At Ventnor, Isle of Wight, after a long illness, the Rev. JohnSterling, in his 39th ... of Cleator. „ , The valuable Rectory of North Cteake, Norfolk, become vacant by the death of the Venerable Archdeacon Bsthnrst. The Living is worth 1100Î. a-yw, and is m the gift of Earl Spencer ... and the Biahiÿi^ of Norwch. By the death of the Archdeacon, the laving of HoHmIbv. Snifolk, has also become vacant. It is in the gift of W, Bolton, Esq., and is worth 830L. per annum. Hj»low (Essex).—The following ... ^eoted to Wansey. Mr. Arnold.—Is this thwOMllbflr Jhrfte City p Mr. Wwisey,—Yes. I by hb’oirii qnést, in order to raise..."

Confidence: Direct and primary evidence
Citation text:

John Sterling
Gender: Male
Birth: July 20 1806 - Isle of Bute, Argyll and Bute, United Kingdom
Death: Sep 18 1844 - Ventnor, Isle of Wight, England, United Kingdom
Wife: Susannah Barton
Child: John Barton Sterling

Confidence: Direct and primary evidence
Date: Sep 19 1844
Citation text:

London St James Chronicle Whiteltall And General Evening Post
Date: Sep 19 1844
Publication: London, Middlesex, United Kingdom
Text: "..., on Àtnrdy, the 14th inst., the Rev. William Jones, Rector of • Scarthoj in Lincolnshire, arid of Lianrillo, in Breconshire.—At Ventnor, Isle of Wight, after a long illness, the Rev. JohnSterling, in his 39th ... of Cleator. „ , The valuable Rectory of North Cteake, Norfolk, become vacant by the death of the Venerable Archdeacon Bsthnrst. The Living is worth 1100Î. a-yw, and is m the gift of Earl Spencer ... and the Biahiÿi^ of Norwch. By the death of the Archdeacon, the laving of HoHmIbv. Snifolk, has also become vacant. It is in the gift of W, Bolton, Esq., and is worth 830L. per annum. Hj»low (Essex).—The following ... ^eoted to Wansey. Mr. Arnold.—Is this thwOMllbflr Jhrfte City p Mr. Wwisey,—Yes. I by hb’oirii qnést, in order to raise..."

Biography

John Sterling

· Born at Kames Castle on the Isle of Bute on 20th July 1806. He belonged to a family of Scottish origin which had settled in Ireland during the Cromwellian period.

· His mother was Hester Coningham, only daughter of John Coningham, Esquire, Merchant in Derry, and of Elizabeth Campbell his wife. She was described as “the queen of the scene, and of the fair world in Derry at that time”. Died 18th September 1844

· His father was (army) Captain Edward Sterling.

· Neither the Coningham nor the Sterling families were rich in 1804. She “had, for the present, no marriage-portion; neither was Edward Sterling rich - according to his own ideas and aims, far from it”.

· Studied one year at the University of Glasgow and then in 1824 entered Trinity College, Cambridge, where he had for tutor Julius Charles Hare. At Cambridge he took a distinguished part in the debates of the union, and, became a member of the Cambridge Apostles, forming friendships with Frederick Denison Maurice and Richard Trench. He removed to Trinity Hall with the intention of graduating in law, but left the university without taking a degree.

· During the next four years he resided chiefly in London, employing himself actively in literature and making a number of literary friends.

· With Maurice he purchased the Athenaeum magazine in 1828 from James Silk Buckingham, but the enterprise was not a pecuniary success.

· Formed an intimacy with the Spanish revolutionist General Torrijos[1], in whose unfortunate expedition he took an active interest. But he did not accompany it, as he was kept in England by his marriage.

· Married Susannah, daughter of Lieutenant-General Charles Barton (1760-1819) and his wife Susannah.

· In 1830 developed symptoms of tuberculosis which induced him to take up his residence in the island of St Vincent, where he had inherited some property, and he remained there fifteen months before returning to England. But Carlyle says John Sterling inherited money from “one of his Mother [nee Hester Coningham] Mrs. Edward Sterling's Uncles, a Coningham from Derry [who] had, in the course of his industrious and adventurous life, realized large property in the West Indies,--a valuable Sugar-estate, with its equipments, in the Island of St. Vincent;--from which Mrs. Sterling and her family were now, and had been for some years before her Uncle's decease, deriving important benefits. I have heard, it was then worth some ten thousand pounds a year to the parties interested. Anthony Sterling, John, and another a cousin of theirs [who?] were ultimately to be heirs, in equal proportions. The old gentleman, always kind to his kindred, and a brave and solid man though somewhat abrupt in his ways, had lately died; leaving a settlement to this effect, not without some intricacies, and almost caprices, in the conditions attached”.

· After spending some time on the Continent in June 1834 he was ordained and became curate at Hurstmonceux, where his old tutor Julius Hare was vicar.

· Acting on the advice of his physician he resigned his clerical duties in the following February (1835), but, according to Carlyle, the primary cause was a divergence from the opinions of the Church. There remained to him the "resource of the pen," but, having to "live all the rest of his days as in continual flight for his very existence," his literary achievements were necessarily fragmentary.

· Published in 1833 Arthur Coningsby, a novel, which attracted little attention, his Poems (1839), the Election, a Poem (1841), and Strafford, a tragedy (1843). None were successful.

· Established a connection in 1837 with Blackwood's Magazine, to which he contributed a variety of papers and several tales of extraordinary promise not fulfilled in his more considerable undertakings. Among these papers were "The Onyx Ring" and "The Palace of Morgana."

· In 1841 he moved to Falmouth, and lectured to the Royal Cornwall Polytechnic Society.[2]

· He died at Ventnor on 18 September 1844, his wife having died in the preceding year.

· His son, Major-General John Barton Sterling (1840-1926), after entering the navy, went into the army in 1861, and had a distinguished career (wounded at Tel-el-Kebir in 1882), both as a soldier and as a writer on military subjects. He commanded the Coldstream Guards until his retirement in 1901. He was a member of the Athenaeum Club and the Royal Yacht Squadron.

John Sterling's papers were entrusted to the joint care of Thomas Carlyle and Archdeacon Hare. Essays and Tales, by John Sterling collected and edited, with a memoir of his life, by Julius Charles Hare, appeared in 1848 in two volumes. So dissatisfied was Carlyle with the memoir that he resolved to give his own testimony about his friend, and his vivid Life (1851) has perpetuated the memory of Sterling more than any of the latter's own writ

Ancestor search:
Search
Search

Download our exceptional genealogy software for free

Fun & simple to use
Imports your GEDCOM files easily
Smart Matching™ technology
Supports 40 languages