George Sleep

Born:Oct 10 1791 In:  Bere Alston, Devon, England
Died:May 1 1883 (at age 91)
Info
Events
Timeline

Immediate family

Mary Ann Sleep (born Skelton)
His wife
Amelia Reddaway (born Sleep)
His daughter
Isaac Sleep
His son
Thomas 'Immigrant' Sleep
His son
Lavinia Channon (born Sleep)
His daughter
Rev. (Weslyan) John Skelton Sleep [Immigrant]
His son
Selina Celena? Pearce (born Sleep)
His daughter
Abraham Sleep
His son
Belina [twin] Waters (born Sleep)
His daughter
Diana "Dinah" Spry (born Sleep)
His daughter
William [Immigrate] Sleep
His son
Samuel [Immigrate] Sleep
His son
Thomas Sleep
His father
Mary Ann Sleep (born Sleep [Sleep [Sleep [Sleep [Sleep [Saunders]]]]])
His mother
John I Sleep
His brother
Abraham Sleep
His brother
Mary Sleep
His sister
Thomas Sleep
His brother
Grace Quance (born Sleep)
His sister
Sampson Sleep
His brother
  

Work

Shoemaker

Source citations

Matched to: George Sleep
Date: May 13 2012
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Added by confirming a Smart Match
Matched to: George SLEEP
Date: May 10 2013
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Matched to: George Sleep
Date: June 2 2013
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Added by confirming a Smart Match
Matched to: Unknown Sleep
Date: Oct 7 2014
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Added by confirming a Smart Match
Matched to: Unknown Sleep
Date: Feb 28 2015
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Added by confirming a Smart Match
Matched to: George Sleep
Date: Sep 5 2015
Citation text:
Added by confirming a Smart Match
Confidence: Direct and primary evidence
Citation text:

George Sleep
Gender: Male
Birth: Between 1792 and 1796 - Out of County
Residence: 1841 - Chaple Street, Beer Ferris, Devon, England
Age: 45 - 49
Wife (implied): Mary Ann Sleep
Children (implied): Lavinia Sleep, Abraham Sleep, Dinah Sleep, William Sleep, Samuel Sleep
Census: Parish:Beer FerrisSeries:HO107Folio:4 County:DevonPiece:0240Family:53 Country:EnglandRegistrar's district:Buckland MonachorumLine:15 Date:1841-00-00Superintendent registrar's district:TavistockImage:2 Enum. District:1 See household members
Household
Relation to head; Name; Age
Head (implied); George Sleep; 45 - 49
Wife (implied); Mary Ann Sleep; 51
Daughter (implied); Lavinia Sleep; 21
Son (implied); Abraham Sleep; 15 - 19
Daughter (implied); Dinah Sleep; 12
Son (implied); William Sleep; 10
Son (implied); Samuel Sleep; 8

Confidence: Direct and primary evidence
Citation text:

George Sleep
Gender: Male
Birth: Between 1792 and 1796 - Out of County
Residence: 1841 - Chaple Street, Beer Ferris, Devon, England
Age: 45 - 49
Wife (implied): Mary Ann Sleep
Children (implied): Lavinia Sleep, Abraham Sleep, Dinah Sleep, William Sleep, Samuel Sleep
Census: Parish:Beer FerrisSeries:HO107Folio:4 County:DevonPiece:0240Family:53 Country:EnglandRegistrar's district:Buckland MonachorumLine:15 Date:1841-00-00Superintendent registrar's district:TavistockImage:2 Enum. District:1 See household members
Household
Relation to head; Name; Age
Head (implied); George Sleep; 45 - 49
Wife (implied); Mary Ann Sleep; 51
Daughter (implied); Lavinia Sleep; 21
Son (implied); Abraham Sleep; 15 - 19
Daughter (implied); Dinah Sleep; 12
Son (implied); William Sleep; 10
Son (implied); Samuel Sleep; 8

Biography

 

 

George Sleep, the "base child" of Mary Saunders was born in Linkinhorne, Cornwall on Monday, 10 October 1791. He was christened in St. Melor's Church, Linkinhorne a little over a week later on Monday, 31 October 1791, the same date on which his parents would be officially joined in wedlock.

 

Because the child was illegitimate, the baptismal register would not record the name of the reputed father - Thomas Sleep.

 

George Sleep passed away in Beeralston, Devonshire, England on Tuesday, 1 May 1883 at the age of 91. Cause of death was given as "senile decay." Informant for the death certificate was his son-in-law Harry Olver, who was present at the time of death. George was buried on the following Sunday - May 5, 1883, most likely in the churchyard of Holy Trinity Church in Bere Alston, where his brother John is also buried. No headstone, however, marks his grave.

In the (scanned) record of the baptism of his daughter Bolina, Dec 19  1826 his occupation was given as Schoolmaster.  AGS

CONC nc.), Database online.

CONC 1 England Census (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004)

CONC , Database online.

CONC work, Inc., 2004), Database online.

CONC work, Inc., 2005), Database online.

CONC nc.), Database online.

CONC nc.), Database online.

CONC 1 England Census (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004)

CONC , Database online.

CONC work, Inc., 2004), Database online.

CONC work, Inc., 2005), Database online.

CONC nc.), Database online.

CONC 1 England Census (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004)

CONC , Database online.

CONC nc.), Database online.

CONC nc.), Database online.

CONC work, Inc., 2004), Database online.

CONC work, Inc., 2005), Database online.

(Medical):From Don Toms 2005

George Sleep, the "base child" of Mary Saunders, was born in Linkinhorn

e, Cornwall, on Monday, October 10, 1791. It is probable that he was named after his 30 year old uncle, George Sleep, a brother to his father Thomas, who had been christened in the Parish of North Hill in 1761.

 

George was christened in St. Melor's Church, Linkinhorne, a little over three weeks later, on Monday, October 31, 1791, the same date on which his parents would officially be joined in wedlock. Because the child was illegimate, the baptismal register would not record the name of the reputed father - Thomas Sleep.

 

This situation was not uncommon, for illegitimacy had increased in England in the latter half of the 18th century, with one in every fourteen children born in agricultural areas being born out of wedlock. When such a condition came to the ears of the local parish officials, however, every effort was made to learn the father of the child so that he, with the mother, could be made responsible for the expense of rearing the child.

 

Why Thomas Sleep waited so long to marry Mary Saunders will probably remain a mystery, but undoubtedly the differences in their ages and possibly the objections of one or more sets of parents could have played a role.

 

Entering the massive stone church with its magnificent 120 foot high tower on that October day in 1791, Mary Saunders would have felt at home, for she, too, had been christened in the church (in 1762) as had her ancestors for two centuries, and she very possibly attended some of the weekly services there. The young Thomas Sleep, from the bordering parish of North Hill, likely found himself in somewhat less familiar territory.

 

Upon completion of the marriage ceremony, Reverend James Coffin and the family would have proceeded from the altar to the back of the church, where the infant George Sleep would have been baptized in the large polyphant stone baptismal font. Constructed in the early 13th century, the font had already witnessed the baptisms of Linkinhorne's children for almost six hundred years.

 

With the traditional service from the English Book of Common Prayer completed, George Sleep became a member of the Christian family and the Church of England. The event was recorded by the minister in the ancient parish register - "George Sleep base Child of Mary Sanders (sic) 31 Oct 1791."

 

Able to both read and write well, George Sleep was most likely educated either at home or possibly at a school in Linkinhorne. Schools were becoming more and more common, and young children under eight years of age were often taught by older women in their cottages. These schools were known as "dame schools." and the education they provided was very elementary .

 

It was from his father Thomas that George Sleep learned his trade, as did George's brother John. Both young men would earn their livelihoods as shoemakers, often referred to in early records as "cordwainers." The name originally referred to workers of cordovan leather, a fine leather originally made at Cordoba, Spain. As shoemakers, the Sleep brothers' position in English society would have been in the catergory of "artisans and other skilled workers, " a group comprising abouth 26% of the population during that period of English history.

 

The Sleep family eventually moved from Linkinhorne to the parish of Landulph to the south, where George, at the age of twenty three, married a young resident of the parish named Mary Ann Skelton in the parish church on W ednesday, June 7, 1815. Fifteen months his senior, Mary was the daughter of Richard Hacker Skelton and his wife Mary (Mutton) Skelton.

 

By 1817 George Sleep and his new wife had moved to the parish of Calstock, Cornwall a few miles to the north of Landulph and bordering on the County of Devon. It was there that their first child Isaac was born sometime in 1817. Nine more children would follow - Thomas (1818), Lavinia (1820 ), John (1821), Celena (1823), Abraham (1825), Belina (1826), Dinah (ca.1829), William (ca.1831) and Samuel (1833).

 

Although both christened and married in the Church of England, George Sleep, soon after arriving in Calstock, became a Noncorformist and joined the Weslyan Methodist Church. Six of his ten children were baptized at a Me thodist Chapel in Calstock by ministers of the Tavistock Circuit of the Wesleyan Church. The circuit included several parishes in the area, both in Cornwall and neighboring Devonshire.

 

It should be noted that George Sleep, for a good part of his life, used his mother's maiden name (Saunders or Sanders), either alone or in combinat ion with the surname "Sleep." For example, he was married as "George Sleep Sanders." In addition, the baptismal entries for his children, who had been baptized in the Wesleyan Church, reflect his inconsistency in t he usage of the two surnames, The entry for one child lists the father as "George Saunders," while for two other children he is recorded as "George Sleep Sanders," and for the remaining three simply as "George Sleep. "

 

Although George's usual occupation continued to be a shoemaker, the baptismal entry for his daughter Belina in 1826 states he was also a "schoolmaster." Apparently a very religious man, it is possible that he taught children in his home when time allowed or in a Sunday School in Calstock. It is also possible that "schoolmaster" was an error in reading "shoemaker," for at no other time does a record make reference to his being a schoolmaster.

 

In 1831 tragedy struck the Sleep family with the death of their eldest child Isaac on August 18th. No cause of death was given for the 14 year old son in the Calstock burial register, although ir did state that Isaac was residing at the time in Gunnislake, the largest of the mining villages within the parish. A wonderful slate headstone in the churchyard at Calstock, however, records that the young man was "Accidentally Kill'd in Virtuous Lady Mine By The Crank Of The Water Wheel." Whether George Sleep and his family also lived in Gunnislake or whether Isaac was simply working there is not known.

 

By the time of the 1841 Census of England, George Sleep and his family had moved from Calstock a short distance across the River Tamar to the parish of Bere Ferrers in the County of Devon. The town of Bere Ferrers, along with the neighboring village of Bere Alston, was on a small picturesque peninsula formed by the River Tamar on the west and the River Tavy on t he east. The Sleeps most likely made their way from Calstock by way of t he main ferry across the Tamar at Calstock Passage, where, at what was later Ferry Farm, was the Passage Inn.

 

The spelling of the name of the town has changed over the years, and many records dating from the early years of the Sleeps' residence there gi ve it as "Beeralston." The Rev. Arthur J.C. Beddow, Rector of the Parish of Bere Ferrers, in his 1975 booklet "A History of Bere Ferrers Parish ," notes: BERE ALSTON probably got its name the following way. In 1339 we read of ALPHAMESTON 'which is a hamlet of Byrfferers': the spelling gradually changes to Berealmiston, Berealbeston, Beeralston and finally Bere Alston. It seems that Alphameston is AELFHELMSTUN, i.e. Aelfelm's tun or farm, Aelfhelm being the local Saxon lord."

 

Around the time the Sleep family took up residence, the Parish of Bere Ferrers, which contained 5888 acres of fertile land, was noted for producing vast quantiesof apples, cherries, strawberries, gooseberries and currants - and the finest cider. Lead and tin mines were also to be found in the area, providing employment to many area residents.

 

Listed on the 1841 Census of Bere Alston are George Sleep, Mary Ann, Lavinia, Dinah, William and Samuel. Their daughter, Belina, aged 14, was sti ll living in Calstock, where she worked as a female servant in the household of a farmer and his wife, John and Mary Mole.

 

George and family were living at that time on Chapel Street in Bere Alston, so named when a branch of the Methodist Church in the village moved from Cornwall Street and built a chapel there. Also residing on the same street were George's brother John and his family. Both heads of household were recorded a "shoemakers."

 

In 1849 a tragic event occured in Bere Alston and Bere Ferrers, which cer tainly would have caused much apprehension in the households of George Sle ep and his brother John. In that year a peddler came to Bere Alston selling watches and jewelry. He brought the terrible disease cholera with him. Although the peddler was eventually seized in the Commercial Hotel in Bere Alston (in more recent years the Anglers Rest), it was too late to prevent an epidemic.

 

The poorhouse at Bere Alston was used as a local hospital during the epidemic, but despite the best efforts, casualities began to mount. During that August in 1849, 89 people [were buried] in the churchyard at Bere Ferrers, with five buried in one day, a significant number for such a sparsely populated area, (in 1850 the parish had a population of 2,142 inhabitants.) There was only one cholera burial in Bere Alston's Holy Trinty Churchyard, for at that time the church was new and the churchyard had not been consecrated. Special permission had to be obtained to bury there, and a box of consecrated earth was sent from Exeter to scatter over the burial spot.

 

The 1851 Census once again records George Sleep as a resident of Bere Alston, although he was then living on Fore Street. The houshold had been reduced in number to include only George, his wife Mary and their son William. Also on the same street were George's brother John, his wife Mary, and six children, ranging in age from two to twenty three. Both brothers still continued their work as "cordwainers." Then, on August 31st of that same year, George's wife Mary Ann died from typhoid fever at the age of 62. The couple had been married for just a little over 36 years.

 

George Sleep had, at some point, become associated with the National Temperance Society in England and its crusade against the use of "strong drink ." One of his possessions, which has survived to be passed down to his descendants, is a bound volume of "The National Temperance Chroncile, Volume II, From January, 1853, to December, 1854," which he apparently conscientiously read. Two pages contain his signature and address "Beeralston" at the top.

 

A listing in "Billing's Directory and Gazetteer of Devonshire 1857" for Bere Alston lists George Sleep, shoemaker and William Sleep, shoemaker. The William is most likely his son, who would have been about 26 years of age at the time. Five years later, in 1862, a postal directory of Devon a nd Cornwall again lists both men following their trade in Bere Alston.

 

In 1871, the census of Bere Alston recorded George Sleep, "Shoe Maker," still residing on Fore Street in Bere Alston. Also included in the household at the time were his daughter Lavinia Jenkin and her three children - James, Bessie and Elizabeth Ann.

 

On Monday, June 4, 1877, George Sleep suffered the loss of his son Abraham Sleep, who passed away in Bere Alston at the age of 52 years, leaving a wife Susanna and ten children, ranging in ages from ten to thirty years. Abraham was buried on the following Friday, presumably in the c hurchyard at Bere Alston.

 

By the time of the 1881 British Census, George Sleep, age 89, was residing in nearby Bere Ferrers with his son in law, George Channon, husband of Lavinia Sleep Channon. George Channon listed his occupation at that time as an agricultural labourer. Lavinia was emunerated as a boarder in the household of Henry T. and Elizabeth J. Wilcocks on Fore Street in Bere Ferrers, where she was working as a "Monthly nurse." Nearby neighbours of George Channon and George Sleep on Bedford Street were George 's granddaughter and her husband, Harry and Bessie OLVER, Bessie being the daughter of Lavinia Sleep by her second husband.

 

George Sleep died in Bere Alston five years later on Tuesday, May 1, 188 3, having lived to the then extraordinary age of 91 years, 6 months and 21 days. The cause of death was registered as "senile decay." Informa nt for the death certificate was his grandson Harry OLVER, who was prese nt at the time of death.

 

George was buried on Saturday, May 5, 1883, in either the churchyard of B ere Alston or Bere Ferrers. As the Reverend A.J.C. Bedow, Rector, Bere Als ton and Bere Ferrers, wrote in 1978, "George Sleep and Abraham Sleep I im agine were buried at Bere Alston, but there is no head stone to eith er of them. There are two churchyards here, one at Bere Alston and o ne at Bere Ferrers. Both are in the same parish and records are kept in o ne register for both churchyards and it does not state in which churchya rd they were buried."

 

From Stephen Hill (descendant of Thomas David Sleep) 2006

 

George Sleep, the "base child" of Mary Saunders was born in Linkinhorn e, Cornwall on Monday, 10 October 1791. He was christened in St. Melor's C hurch, Linkinhorne a little over a week later on Monday, 31 October 179 1, the same date on which his parents would be officially joined in wedloc k.

Because the child was illegimate, the baptismal register would not reco rd the name of the reputed father - Thomas Sleep

 

George SLEEP Sanders & Mary Ann SKELTON married by bAnns in the parish ch urch of Linkinhorne 7th June 1815 with the consent of the parents. Richa rd Hacker SKELTON & William NANCARROW witnessed the marriage. Moved to Cal stock near the Cornwall / Devon border. Christened Church of England, join ed the Wesleyan Methodist church approx. 1809, 6 of the 10 children christ ened Methodist. One child He was known as George SAUNDERS, 2 - George SLE EP SAUNDERS and 3 others - George SLEEP. Taught children their school less ons

Moved to Devon by 1841

 

The marriage of George Sleep and Mary Ann Skelton is recorded in the Marr iage register of the parish church of Landulph, Cornwall. Entry No. 9 on P age 3 of the record of marriages for the period of 1813 - 1837 reads:

GEORGE SLEEP SAUNDERS of this parish bachelor and MARY Ann SKELTON of th is parish spinster married in this church by bAnns with consent of paren ts this seventh day of June 1815. Witnesses: Richard Hacker Skelton Wm. Na ncarrow

 

George Sleep passed away in Beeralston, Devonshire, England on Tuesda y, 1 May 1883 at the age of 91. Cause of death was given as "senile decay ". Informant for the death certificate was his son-in-law Harry OLVER, w ho was present at the time of death. George was buried on the following Su nday - May 5 1883, most likely in the churchyard of Holy Trinty Chur ch in Bere Alston, where his brother John is also buried. No head stone, h owever, marks his grave.

 

[SLEEP (melanie).]

 

George Sleep, the "base child" of Mary Sau nders was born in Linkinhorn e, Cornwall on Monday, 10 October 1791. He was christened in St. Melor 's Church, Linkinhorne a lit tle over a week later on Monday, 31 October 1 791, the same date on which his parents would be offic ially joined in wed lock.

Because the child was illegitimate, the baptismal register would not re co rd the name of the reputed father - Thomas Sleep.

 

George Sleep passed away in Beeralston, Devonshire, England on Tues da y, 1 May 1883 at the age of 91. Cause of death was given as "senile de cay." Informant for the dea th certificate was his son-in-law Harry OLVE R, who was present at the time of death.

George was buri ed on the following Sunday - May 5, 1883, most like ly in the churchyard of Holy Trinity Church in Bere Alsto n, where his bro ther John is alsoburied. No headstone, however, marks his grave.

(taken from FTM disk number 25)[Brderbund WFT Vol. 25, Ed. 1, Tree #2 72 8, Date of Import: Jun 3, 1999]

 

[erica.pdf.FTW]

 

Harry Oliver present at death

Notes

Steve Belanger: gencircles.com.

Individual:

George Sleep, the "base child" of Mary Saunders was born in Linkinhorne, Cornwall on Monday, 10 October 1791. He was christened in St. Melor's Church, Linkinhorne a little over a week later on Monday, 31 October 1791, the same date on which his parents would be officially joined in wedlock. Because the child was illegitimate, the baptismal register would not record the name of the reputed father--- Thomas Sleep.

George Sleep passed away in Beeralston, Devonshire, England on Tuesday, 1 May 1883 at the age of 91. Cause of death was given as "senile decay." Informant for the death certificate was his son-in-law Harry Olver, who was present at the time of death. George was buried on the following Sunday - May 5, 1883, most likely in the churchyard of Holy Trinity Church in Bere Alston, where his brother John is alsoburied. No headstone, however, marks his grave. (Taken from FTM disk number 25)[Br²derbund WFT Vol. 25, Ed. 1, Tree #2728, Date of Import: Jun 3, 1999]

George Sleep, the "base child" of Mary Saunders was born in Linkinhorne, Cornwall on Monday, 10

October 1791. He was christened in St. Melor's Church, Linkinhorne a little over a week later on

Monday, 31 October 1791, the same date on which his parents would be officially joined in wedlock.

Because the child was illegitimate, the baptismal register would not record the name of the reputed father

- Thomas Sleep.

George Sleep passed away in Beeralston, Devonshire, England on Tuesday, 1 May 1883 at the age of

91. Cause of death was given as "senile decay." Informant for the death certificate was his son-in-law

Harry Olver, (Grand daughter Bessie's husband?  Not son-in-law) (AGS) who was present at the time of death. George was buried on the following Sunday - May 5,

1883, most likely in the churchyard of Holy Trinity Church in Bere Alston, where his brother John is also

buried. No headstone, however, marks his grave.

(taken from FTM disk number 25)[Brøderbund WFT Vol. 25, Ed. 1, Tree #2728, Date of Import: Jun 3, 1999]

 

George Sleep, the "base child" of Mary Saunders was born in Linkinhorne, Cornwall on Monday, 10 October 1791. He was christened in St. Melor's Church, Linkinhorne a little over a week later on Monday, 31 October 1791, the same date on which his parents would be officially joined in wedlock. Because the child was illegitimate, the baptismal register would not record the name of the reputed father - Thomas Sleep.

George Sleep passed away in Beeralston, Devonshire, England on Tuesday, 1 May 1883 at the age of 91. Cause of death was given as "senile decay." Informant for the death certificate was his son-in-law Harry Olver, who was present at the time of death. George was buried on the following Sunday - May 5, 1883, most likely in the churchyard of Holy Trinity Church in Bere Alston, where his brother John is also buried. No headstone, however, marks his grave.

 

 

George Sleep Sanders & Mary Ann Skelton married by banns in the parish church of Linkinhorne 7th June 1815 with the consent of the parents. Richard Hacker Skelton & William Nancarrow witnessed the marriage. Moved to Calstock near the Cornwall / Devon border. Christened Church of England, joined the Wesleyan Methodist church approx. 1809, 6 of the 10 children christened Methodist. One child He was known as George Saunders, 2 - George Sleep Saunders and 3 others - George Sleep. Taught children their school lessons

Moved to Devon by 1841

 

From Don Toms 2005

George Sleep, the "base child" of Mary Saunders, was born in Linkinhorne, Cornwall, on Monday, October 10, 1791. It is probable that he was named after his 30 year old uncle, George Sleep, a brother ro his father Thomas, who had been christened in the Parish of North Hill in 1761.

 

George was christened in St. melor's Church, Linkinhorne, a little over three weeks later, on Monday, October 31, 1791, the same date on which is parents would officially joined in wedlock. Because the child was illegimate, the baptismal register would not record the name of the reputed father - Thomas Sleep.

 

This situation was not uncommon, for illegitimacy had increased in England in the latter half of the 18th century, with one in every fourteen children born in agricultural areas being born out of wedlock. When such a condition came to the ears of the local parish officials, however, every effort was made learn of the father of the child so that he, with the mother, could be made responsible for the expense of rearing the child.

 

Why Thomas Sleep waited so long to marry Mary Saunders will probably remain a mystery, but undoubtedly the differences in their ages and possibly the objections of one or more sets of parents could have played a role.

 

Entering the massive stone church with its magnificent 120 foot high tower on that October day in 1791, Mary Saunders would have felt at home, for she, too, had been christened in the church (in 1762) as had her ancestors for two centuries, and she very possibly attended some of the weekly services there. The young Thomas Sleep, from the bordering parish of North Hill, likely found himself in somewhat less familiar territory.

 

Upon completion of marriage ceremony, Reverend James Coffin and the family would have proceeded from the altar to the back of the church, where the infant George Sleep would have been baptized in the large polyphant stone baptismal font. Constructed in the early 13th century, the font had already witnessed the baptisms of Linkinhorne's children for almost six hundred years.

 

With the traditional service from the Enmglish Book of Common Prayer completed, George Sleep became a member of the Christian family and the Church of England. The event was recorded by the minister in the ancient parish register - "George Sleep base Child of Mary Sanders (sic) 31 Oct 1791."

 

Able to both read and write well, George Sleep was most likely educated either at home or possibly at a school in Linkinhorne. Schools were becoming more and more common, and young children under eight years of age were often taught by older women in their cottages. These schools were known as "dame schools." and the education thgey provided was very elementary.

 

It was from his father Thomas that George Sleep learned his trade, as did George's brother John. Both young men would earn their livelihoods as shoemakers, often referred to in early records as "cordwainers." The name originally referred to workers of cordovan leather, a fine leather originally made at Cordoba, Spain. As shoemakers, the Sleep brothers' position in English society would have been in the catergory of "artisans and other skilled workers," a group comprising abouth 26% of the population during that period of English history.

 

The Sleep family eventually moved from Linkinhorne to the parish of Landulph to the south, where George, at the age of twenty three, married a young resident of the parish named Mary Anne Skelton in the parish church on Wednesday, June 7, 1815. Fiveteen months his senior, Mary was the daughter of Richard Hacker Skelton and his wife Mary (Mutton) Skelton.

 

By 1817 George Sleep and his new wife had moved to the parish of Calstock, Cornwall a few miles to the north of Landulph and bordering on the County of Devon. It was there that their first child Isaac was born sometime in 1817. Nine more children would follow - Thomas (1818), Lavinia (1820), John (1821), Celena (1823), Abraham (1825), Belina (1826), Dinah (ca.1829), William (ca.1831) and Samuel (1833).

 

Although both christened and married in the Church of England, George Sleep, soon after arriving in Calstock, became a Noncorformist and joined the Weslyan Methodist Church. Six of his ten children were baptized at a Methodist Chapel in Calstock by ministers of the Tavistock Circuit of the Wesleyan Church. The circuit included several parishes in the area, both in Cornwall and neighboring Devonshire.

 

It should be noted that George Sleep, for a good part of his life, used his mother's maiden name (Saunders or Sanders), either alone or in combination with the surname "Sleep." For example, he was married as "George Sleep Sanders." In addition, the baptismal entries for his children, who had been baptized in the Wesleyan Church, reflect his inconsistency in the usage of the two surnames, The entry for one child lists the father as "George Saunders," while for two other children he is recorded as "George Sleep Sanders," and for the remaining three simply as "George Sleep."

 

Although George's usual occupation continued to be a shoemaker, the baptismal entry for his daughter Belina in 1826 states he was also a "schoolmater." Apparently a very religious man, it is possible that he taught children in his home when time allowed or in a Sunday School in Calstock. It is also possible that "schoolmaster" was an error in reading "shoemaker," for at no other time does a record make reference to his being a schoolmaster.

 

In 1831 tragedy struck the Sleep family with the death of their eldest child Isaac on August 18th. No cause of death was given for the 14 year old son in the Calstock burial register, although ir did state that Isaac was residing at the time in Gunnislake, th largesat of the mining villages within the parish. A wonderful slate headstone in the churchyard at Calstock, however, records that the young man was "Accidentally Kill'd in Virtuous Lady Mine By The Crank Of The Water Wheel." Whether George Sleep and his family also lived in Gunnislake or whether Isaac was simply working there is not known.

 

By the time of the 1841 Census of England, George Sleep and his family had moved from Calstock a short distance across the River Tamar to the parish of Bere Ferrers in the County of Devon. The town of Bere Ferrers, along with the neighboring village of Bere Alston, was on a small picturesque peninsula formed by the River Tamar on the west and the River Tavy on the east. The Sleeps most likely made their way from Calstock by way of the main ferry across the Tamar at Calstock Passage, wher at what was later Ferry Farm, was the Passage Inn.

 

The spelling of the name of the town has changed over the years, and many records dating from the early years of the Sleeps' residence there give it as "Beeralston." The Rev. Arthur J.C. Beddow, Rector of the Parish of Bere Ferrers, in his 1975 booklet "A History of Bere Ferrers Parish," notes: BERE ALSTON probably got its name the following way. In 1339 we read of ALPHAMESTON 'which is a hamlet of Byrfferers': the spelling gradually changes to Berealmiston, Berealbeston, Beeralston and finally Bere Alston. It seems that Alphameston is AELFHELMSTUN, i.e. Aelfelm's tun or farm, Aelfhelm being the local Saxon lord."

 

Around the time the Sleep family took up residence, the Parish of Bere Ferrers, which contained 5888 acres of fertile land, was noted for producing vast quantiesof apples, cherries, strawberries, gooseberries and currants - and the finest cider. Lead and tin mines were also to be found in the area, providing employment to many area residents.

 

Listed on the 1841 Census of Bere Alston are George Sleep, Mary Anne, Lavinia, Dinah, William and Samuel. Their daughter, Belina, aged 14, was still living in Calstock, where she worked as a female servant in the household of a farmer and his wife, John and Mary Mole.

 

George and family were living at that time on Chapel Street in Bere Alston, so named when a branch of the Methodist Church in the village moved from Cornwall Street and built a chapel there. Also residing on the same street were George's brother John and his family. Both heads of household were recorded a "shoemakers."

 

In 1849 a tragic event occured in Bere Alston and Bere Ferrers, which certainly would have caused much apprehension in the households of George Sleep and his brother John. In that year a peddler came to Bere Alston selling watches and jewelry. He brought the terrible disease cholera with him. Although the peddler was eventually seized in the Commercial Hotel in Bere Alston (in more recent years the Anglers Rest, it was too late to prevent an epidemic.

 

The poorhouse at Bere Alston was used as a local hospital during the epidemic, but despite the best efforts, casualities began to mount. During that August in 1849, 89 people in the churchyard at Bere Ferrers, with five buried in one day, a significant number for such a sparsely populated area, (in 1850 the parish had a population of 2,142 inhabitants.) There was only one cholera burial in Bere Alston's Holy Trinty Churchyard, for at that time the church was new and the churchyard had not been consecrated. Special permission had to be obtained to bury there, and a box of consecrated earth was sent from Exeter to scatter over the burial spot.

 

The 1851 Census once again records George Sleep as a resident of Bere Alston, although he was then living on Fore Street. The houshold had been reduced in number to include only George, his wife Mary and their son William. Also on the same street were George's brother John, his wife Mary, and six children, raniging in age from two to twenty three. Both brothers still continued their work as "cordwainers." Then, on August 31st of that same year, George's wife Mary Anne died from typhoid fever at the age of 62. The couple had been married for just a little over 36 years.

 

George Sleep had, at some point, become associated with the National Temperance Society in England and its crusade against the use of "strong drink." One of his possessions, which has survived to be passed down to his descendants, is a bound volume of "The National Temperance Chroncile, Volume II, From January, 1853, to December, 1854," which he apparently conscientiously read. Two pages contain his signature and address "Beeralston" at the top.

 

A listing in "Billing's Directory and Gazetteer of Devonshire 1857" for Bere Alston lists George Sleep, shoemaker and William Sleep, shoemaker. The William is most likely his son, who would have been about 26 years of age at the time. Five years later, in 1862, a postal directory of Devon and Cornwall again lists both men following their trade in Bere Alston.

 

In 1871, the census of Bere Alston recorded George Sleep, "Shoe Maker," still residing on Fore Street in Bere Alston. Also included in the household at the time were his daughter Lavinia Jenkin and her three children - James, Bessie and Elizabeth Anne.

 

On Monday, June 4, 1877, George Sleep suffered the loss of his son Abraham Sleep, who passed away in Bere Alston at the age of 52 years, leaving a wife SusAnnea and ten children, ranging in ages from ten to thirty years years. Abraham was buried on the following Friday, presumably in the churchyard at Bere Alston.

 

By the time of the 1881 British Census, George Sleep, age 89, was residing in nearby Bere Ferrers with his son in law, George ChAnneon, husband of Lavinia Sleep ChAnneon. George ChAnneon listed his occupation at that time as an agricultural labourer. Lavinia was emunerated as a boarder in the household of Henry T. and Elizabeth J. Wilcocks on Fore Street in Bere Ferrers, where she was working as a "Monthly nurse." Nearby neighbours of George ChAnneon and George Sleep on Bedford Street were George's granddaughter and her husband, Harry and Bessie OLVER, Bessie being the daughter of Lavinia Sleep by her second husband.

 

George Sleep died in Bere Alston five years later on Tuesday, May 1, 1883, having lived to the then extraordinary age of 91 years, 6 months and 21 days. The cause of death was registered as "senile decay." Informant for the death certificate was his grandson Harry OLVER, who was present at the time of death.

 

George was buried on Saturday, May 5, 1883, in either the churchyard of Bere Alston or Bere Ferrers. As the Reverend A.J.C. Bedow, Rector, Bere Alston and Bere Ferrers, wrote in 1978, "George Sleep and Abraham Sleep I imagine were buried at Bere Alston, but there is no head stone to either of them. There are two churchyards here, one at Bere Alston and one at Bere Ferrers. Both are in the same parish and records are kept in one register for both churchyards and it does not state in which churchyard they were buried."

 

From Stephen Hill (descendant of Thomas David Sleep) 2006

Channon was spelt as ChAnnon in the other note.

(Medical):From Don Toms 2005

George Sleep, the "base child" of Mary Saunders, was born in Linkinhorn

e, Cornwall, on Monday, October 10, 1791. It is probable that he was nam ed after his 30 year old uncle, George Sleep, a brother ro his father Thom as, who had been christened in the Parish of North Hill in 1761.

 

George was christened in St. melor's Church, Linkinhorne, a little over t hree weeks later, on Monday, October 31, 1791, the same date on which is p arents would officially joined in wedlock. Because the child was illegimat e, the baptismal register would not record the name of the reputed fath er - Thomas Sleep.

 

This situation was not uncommon, for illegitimacy had increased in Engla nd in the latter half of the 18th century, with one in every fourteen chil dren born in agricultural areas being born out of wedlock. When such a con dition came to the ears of the local Parish officials, however, every effo rt was made learn of the father of the child so that he, with the mothe r, could be made responsible for the expense of rearing the child.

 

Why Thomas Sleep waited so long to marry Mary Saunders will probably rema in a mystery, but undoubtedly the differences in their ages and possibly t he objections of one or more sets of parents could have played a role.

 

Entering the massive stone church with its magnificent 120 foot high tow er on that October day in 1791, Mary Saunders would have felt at home, f or she, too, had been christened in the church (in 1762) as had her ancest ors for two centuries, and she very possibly attended some of the weekly s ervices there. The young Thomas Sleep, from the bordering Parish of Nor th Hill, likely found himself in somewhat less familiar territory.

 

Upon completion of marriage ceremony, Reverend James Coffin and the fami ly would have proceeded from the altar to the back of the church, where t he infant George Sleep would have been baptized in the large polyphant sto ne baptismal font. Constructed in the early 13th century, the font had alr eady witnessed the baptisms of Linkinhorne's children for almost six hundr ed years.

 

With the traditional service from the Enmglish Book of Common Prayer comp leted, George Sleep became a member of the Christian family and the Chur ch of England. The event was recorded by the minister in the ancient pari sh register - "George Sleep base Child of Mary Sanders (sic) 31 Oct 1791."

 

Able to both read and write well, George Sleep was most likely educated e ither at home or possibly at a school in Linkinhorne. Schools were becomi ng more and more common, and young children under eight years of age we re often taught by older women in their cottages. These schools were kno wn as "dame schools." and the education thgey provided was very elementary .

 

It was from his father Thomas that George Sleep learned his trade, as d id George's brother John. Both young men would earn their livelihoods as s hoemakers, often referred to in early records as "cordwainers." The name o riginally referred to workers of cordovan leather, a fine leather original ly made at Cordoba, Spain. As shoemakers, the Sleep brothers' positi on in English society would have been in the catergory of "artisans and ot her skilled workers," a group comprising abouth 26% of the population duri ng that period of English history.

 

The Sleep family eventually moved from Linkinhorne to the Parish of Landu lph to the south, where George, at the age of twenty three, married a you ng resident of the Parish named Mary Ann Skelton in the Parish church on W ednesday, June 7, 1815. Fiveteen months his senior, Mary was the daught er of Richard Hacker Skelton and his wife Mary (Mutton) Skelton.

 

By 1817 George Sleep and his new wife had moved to the Parish of Calstoc k, Cornwall a few miles to the north of Landulph and bordering on the Coun ty of Devon. It was there that their first child Isaac was born someti me in 1817. Nine more children would follow - Thomas (1818), Lavinia (1820 ), John (1821), Celena (1823), Abraham (1825), Belina (1826), Dinah (ca.18 29), William (ca.1831) and Samuel (1833).

 

Although both christened and married in the Church of England, George Sle ep, soon after arriving in Calstock, became a Noncorformist and joined t he Weslyan Methodist Church. Six of his ten children were baptized at a Me thodist Chapel in Calstock by ministers of the Tavistock Circuit of the We sleyan Church. The circuit included several parishes in the area, bo th in Cornwall and neighboring Devonshire.

 

It should be noted that George Sleep, for a good part of his life, used h is mother's maiden name (Saunders or Sanders), either alone or in combinat ion with the surname "Sleep." For example, he was married as "George Sle ep Sanders." In addition, the baptismal entries for his children, who h ad been baptized in the Wesleyan Church, reflect his inconsistency in t he usage of the two surnames, The entry for one child lists the fath er as "George Saunders," while for two other children he is recorded as "G eorge Sleep Sanders," and for the remaining three simply as "George Sleep. "

 

Although George's usual occupation continued to be a shoemaker, the bapti smal entry for his daughter Belina in 1826 states he was also a "schoolmat er." Apparently a very religious man, it is possible that he taught childr en in his home when time allowed or in a Sunday School in Calstoc k. It is also possible that "schoolmaster" was an error in reading "shoema ker," for at no other time does a record make reference to his being a sch oolmaster.

 

In 1831 tragedy struck the Sleep family with the death of their eldest ch ild Isaac on August 18th. No cause of death was given for the 14 year o ld son in the Calstock burial register, although ir did state that Isaac w as residing at the time in Gunnislake, th largesat of the mining villag es within the Parish. A wonderful slate headstone in the churchyard at Cal stock, however, records that the young man was "Accidentally Kill'd in Vir tuous Lady Mine By The Crank Of The Water Wheel." Whether George Sleep a nd his family also lived in Gunnislake or whether Isaac was simply worki ng there is not known.

 

By the time of the 1841 Census of England, George Sleep and his family h ad moved from Calstock a short distance across the River Tamar to the pari sh of Bere Ferrers in the County of Devon. The town of Bere Ferrers, alo ng with the neighboring village of Bere Alston, was on a small picturesq ue peninsula formed by the River Tamar on the west and the River Tavy on t he east. The Sleeps most likely made their way from Calstock by way of t he main ferry across the Tamar at Calstock Passage, wher at what was lat er Ferry Farm, was the Passage Inn.

 

The spelling of the name of the town has changed over the years, and ma ny records dating from the early years of the Sleeps' residence there gi ve it as "Beeralston." The Rev. Arthur J.C. Beddow, Rector of the Pari sh of Bere Ferrers, in his 1975 booklet "A History of Bere Ferrers Parish ," notes: BERE ALSTON probably got its name the following way. In 13 39 we read of ALPHAMESTON 'which is a hamlet of Byrfferers': the spelli ng gradually changes to Berealmiston, Berealbeston, Beeralston and final ly Bere Alston. It seems that Alphameston is AELFHELMSTUN, i.e. Aelfelm 's tun or farm, Aelfhelm being the local Saxon lord."

 

Around the time the Sleep family took up residence, the Parish of Bere Fe rrers, which contained 5888 acres of fertile land, was noted for produci ng vast quantiesof apples, cherries, strawberries, gooseberries and curran ts - and the finest cider. Lead and tin mines were also to be found in t he area, providing employment to many area residents.

 

Listed on the 1841 Census of Bere Alston are George Sleep, Mary Ann, Lavi nia, Dinah, William and Samuel. Their daughter, Belina, aged 14, was sti ll living in Calstock, where she worked as a female servant in the househo ld of a farmer and his wife, John and Mary Mole.

 

George and family were living at that time on Chapel Street in Bere Alsto n, so named when a branch of the Methodist Church in the village moved fr om Cornwall Street and built a chapel there. Also residing on the same str eet were George's brother John and his family. Both heads of household we re recorded a "shoemakers."

 

In 1849 a tragic event occured in Bere Alston and Bere Ferrers, which cer tainly would have caused much apprehension in the households of George Sle ep and his brother John. In that year a peddler came to Bere Alston selli ng watches and jewelry. He brought the terrible disease cholera with hi m. Although the peddler was eventually seized in the Commercial Hotel in B ere Alston (in more recent years the Anglers Rest, it was too late to prev ent an epidemic.

 

The poorhouse at Bere Alston was used as a local hospital during the epid emic, but despite the best efforts, casualities began to mount. During th at August in 1849, 89 people in the churchyard at Bere Ferrers, with fi ve buried in one day, a significant number for such a sparsely populated a rea, (in 1850 the Parish had a population of 2,142 inhabitants.) There w as only one cholera burial in Bere Alston's Holy Trinty Churchyard, f or at that time the church was new and the churchyard had not been consecr ated. Special permission had to be obtained to bury there, and a box of co nsecrated earth was sent from Exeter to scatter over the burial spot.

 

The 1851 Census once again records George Sleep as a resident of Bere Als ton, although he was then living on Fore Street. The houshold had been red uced in number to include only George, his wife Mary and their son Willia m. Also on the same street were George's brother John, his wife Mary, a nd six children, raniging in age from two to twenty three. Both brothers s till continued their work as "cordwainers." Then, on August 31st of that s ame year, George's wife Mary Ann died from typhoid fever at the age of 6 2. The couple had been married for just a little over 36 years.

 

George Sleep had, at some point, become associated with the National Temp erance Society in England and its crusade against the use of "strong drink ." One of his possessions, which has survived to be passed down to his des cendants, is a bound volume of "The National Temperance Chroncile, Volu me II, From January, 1853, to December, 1854," which he apparently conscie ntiously read. Two pages contain his signature and address "Beeralsto n" at the top.

 

A listing in "Billing's Directory and Gazetteer of Devonshire 1857" for B ere Alston lists George Sleep, shoemaker and William Sleep, shoemaker. T he William is most likely his son, who would have been about 26 years of a ge at the time. Five years later, in 1862, a postal directory of Devon a nd Cornwall again lists both men following their trade in Bere Alston.

 

In 1871, the census of Bere Alston recorded George Sleep, "Shoe Maker," s till residing on Fore Street in Bere Alston. Also included in the househo ld at the time were his daughter Lavinia Jenkin and her three children - J ames, Bessie and Elizabeth Ann.

 

On Monday, June 4, 1877, George Sleep suffered the loss of his son Abrah am Sleep, who passed away in Bere Alston at the age of 52 years, leavi ng a wife Susannea and ten children, ranging in ages from ten to thirty ye ars years. Abraham was buried on the following Friday, presumably in the c hurchyard at Bere Alston.

 

By the time of the 1881 British Census, George Sleep, age 89, was residi ng in nearby Bere Ferrers with his son in law, George ChAnnon, husba nd of Lavinia Sleep ChAnnon. George ChAnnon listed his occupation at th at time as an agricultural labourer. Lavinia was emunerated as a board er in the household of Henry T. and Elizabeth J. Wilcocks on Fore Stre et in Bere Ferrers, where she was working as a "Monthly nurse." Nearby nei ghbours of George ChAnnon and George Sleep on Bedford Street were George 's granddaughter and her husband, Harry and Bessie OLVER, Bessie being t he daughter of Lavinia Sleep by her second husband.

 

George Sleep died in Bere Alston five years later on Tuesday, May 1, 188 3, having lived to the then extraordinary age of 91 years, 6 months a nd 21 days. The cause of death was registered as "senile decay." Informa nt for the death certificate was his grandson Harry OLVER, who was prese nt at the time of death.

 

George was buried on Saturday, May 5, 1883, in either the churchyard of B ere Alston or Bere Ferrers. As the Reverend A.J.C. Bedow, Rector, Bere Als ton and Bere Ferrers, wrote in 1978, "George Sleep and Abraham Sleep I im agine were buried at Bere Alston, but there is no head stone to eith er of them. There are two churchyards here, one at Bere Alston and o ne at Bere Ferrers. Both are in the same Parish and records are kept in o ne register for both churchyards and it does not state in which churchya rd they were buried."

 

From Stephen Hill (descendant of Thomas David Sleep) 2006

 

George Sleep, the "base child" of Mary Saunders was born in Linkinhorn e, Cornwall on Monday, 10 October 1791. He was christened in St. Melor's C hurch, Linkinhorne a little over a week later on Monday, 31 October 179 1, the same date on which his parents would be officially joined in wedloc k.

Because the child was illegimate, the baptismal register would not reco rd the name of the reputed father - Thomas Sleep

 

George Sleep Sanders & Mary Ann SKELTON married by bAnns in the Parish ch urch of Linkinhorne 7th June 1815 with the consent of the parents. Richa rd Hacker SKELTON & William NANCARROW witnessed the marriage. Moved to Cal stock near the Cornwall / Devon border. Christened Church of England, join ed the Wesleyan Methodist church approx. 1809, 6 of the 10 children christ ened Methodist. One child He was known as George Saunders, 2 - George SLE EP Saunders and 3 others - George Sleep. Taught children their school less ons

Moved to Devon by 1841

 

The marriage of George Sleep and Mary Ann Skelton is recorded in the Marr iage register of the Parish church of Landulph, Cornwall. Entry No. 9 on P age 3 of the record of marriages for the period of 1813 - 1837 reads:

GEORGE Sleep Saunders of this Parish bachelor and MARY Ann SKELTON of th is Parish spinster married in this church by bAnns with consent of paren ts this seventh day of June 1815. Witnesses: Richard Hacker Skelton Wm. Na ncarrow

 

George Sleep passed away in Beeralston, Devonshire, England on Tuesda y, 1 May 1883 at the age of 91. Cause of death was given as "senile decay ". Informant for the death certificate was his son-in-law Harry OLVER, w ho was present at the time of death. George was buried on the following Su nday - May 5 1883, most likely in the churchyard of Holy Trinty Chur ch in Bere Alston, where his brother John is also buried. No head stone, h owever, marks his grave.

 

[Sleep (melanie).]

 

George Sleep, the "base child" of Mary Sau nders was born in Linkinhorn e, Cornwall on Monday, 10 October 1791. He was christened in St. Melor 's Church, Linkinhorne a lit tle over a week later on Monday, 31 October 1 791, the same date on which his parents would be offic ially joined in wed lock.

Because the child was illegitimate, the baptismal register would not re co rd the name of the reputed father - Thomas Sleep.

 

George Sleep passed away in Beeralston, Devonshire, England on Tues da y, 1 May 1883 at the age of 91. Cause of death was given as "senile de cay." Informant for the dea th certificate was his son-in-law Harry OLVE R, who was present at the time of death.

George was buri ed on the following Sunday - May 5, 1883, most like ly in the churchyard of Holy Trinity Church in Bere Alsto n, where his bro ther John is alsoburied. No headstone, however, marks his grave.

(taken from FTM disk number 25)[Brderbund WFT Vol. 25, Ed. 1, Tree #2 72 8, Date of Import: Jun 3, 1999]

 

[erica.pdf.FTW]

 

Harry Oliver present at death

1841 England Census about Lavinia Sleep Name: Lavinia Sleep
Age: 21
Estimated birth year:  abt 1820
Gender: Female
 
Civil Parish: Beer Ferris
Hundred: Roborough
County/Island: Devon
Country: England
 
Street address:

Occupation: 
View image
 
Registration district: Tavistock
Sub-registration district: Buckland Monachorum
Neighbors:  View others on page
Piece: 240
Book: 2
Folio: 4
Page Number: 2
Household Members:  Name Age
 George Sleep  45
 Mary Ann Sleep  51
 Lavinia Sleep  21
 Abraham Sleep  15
 Dinah Sleep  12
 William Sleep  10
 Samuel Sleep  8

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