Elisabeth Andreassen: Bringing Pride to Her Norwegian Country Folk Ancestors

When Elisabeth Andreassen took the Eurovision stage with Hanne Krogh in 1985, their home country of Norway had never won the Eurovision Song Contest before. It had only made the top 5 twice in the history of the contest. The duo, known as Bobbysocks!, gave a stunning performance of their upbeat tribute to old rock ‘n’ roll, “La Det Swinge” (“Let It Swing”)—and brought home Norway’s first-ever Eurovision victory.

It wasn’t the first time Elisabeth had appeared in the contest, nor the first time she’d scored in the top 5; she was a member of Chips, which placed 2nd in Eurovision 1982. She went on to perform twice more in Eurovision: once in a duet with Jan Werner Danielsen in 1994, and once as a soloist in 1996!

Using our state-of-the-art DNA analysis and records we found through SuperSearch, MyHeritage dove into Elisabeth’s family history to discover the roots of one of the singers who succeeded in finally putting Norway on the map of Eurovision-winning countries.

Earlier this week, Elisabeth visited the #EurovisionBus in Oslo for her family history and MyHeritage DNA reveal.

Watch what happened here:

Elisabeth’s MyHeritage DNA Results

Elisabeth’s MyHeritage DNA results show that, unsurprisingly, she is overwhelmingly of Scandinavian origin (81.1%), with some Finnish (14.1%), a little Irish, Scottish, and Welsh (3.8%), and a dash of Baltic heritage (1%).

The closest relative we found matching Elisabeth’s DNA was a first-cousin-once-removed. In addition to the one close family member, Elisabeth has over 4,500 relatives from 30 different countries worldwide that she can now reach out to directly from the MyHeritage platform.

Johan Severin Larson, great-grandfather and Lars Karlsen Hjelle (Klokk), great-great-grandfather

Elisabeth’s great-grandfather on her father’s side, Johan Severin Larson, lived with his father on the farm of Jellebro. We found records of him in the 1910 census, where he was listed as a shoemaker. His father, Lars Karlsen Hjelle (Klokk), was listed as a farmer and a butcher.

Record indicating Johan Larson was a shoemaker
Record indicating Johan Larson was a shoemaker

The Sykkylven farmbook notes that Johan’s father, Lars, helped build the famous Geirangervegen — the Geiranger mountain pass (pictured below).

The Geirangervegen
The Geirangervegen

Lars was a man of multiple trades: aside from being a farmer and butcher, he was also a fisherman, a mason and a roadworker. The farmbook notes that Lars’s son Johan also engaged in trades other than shoemaking: in addition to winter-fishing, he worked for many years with Heinrich Schmidt on Blindheim in Sykkylven. Schmidt was a German-Danish-Norwegian architect and builder whose trademark “Schmidt homes” can be found throughout Sykkylven. Johan walked to and from work every day—about 5 kilometers each way!—until he acquired a bike. There’s no way to know for sure, but he could very well have had a hand in building many of the Schmidt homes in the area.

A typical Schmidt house in Sykkylven
A typical Schmidt house in Sykkylven

Marte Oline Tusvik, 3rd great-grandmother

Pictured below is Marte Oline Tusvik, Elisabeth’s 3rd great-grandmother, also on her father’s side. She was married to Jon Lassen, Ytre Fauske—known as Myhre-Jo to his friends. The story in the farmbook says that he loved children. He had a red knitted hat that he slept with every night, and some of the children on the neighboring farms would steal the hat so he would have to come visit them at the end of the day to pick it up. He and his wife were both very much loved by the people in the area.

Marte Oline Tusvik, Elisabeth’s 3rd great-grandmother
Marte Oline Tusvik, Elisabeth’s 3rd great-grandmother

Louise Hjelle, grandmother

We also found a confirmation record of Elisabeth’s grandmother, Louise Hjelle. It says she was born in Blindheim and lived on the Hjelle farm, and that her knowledge of religion was “very good.” She was confirmed on October 18, 1931.

Confirmation record of Elisabeth’s grandmother, Louise Hjelle
Confirmation record of Elisabeth’s grandmother, Louise Hjelle

Martha Monsdatter, great-great-grandmother

Finally, we found a record of Elisabeth’s great-great-grandmother on her mother’s side, Martha Monsdatter. Below is an excerpt of the Sunnylven farmbook, where Guri Marta and her husband Ole Karl are mentioned as living in the Åkernes farm.

Excerpt from Sunnylven farmbook
Excerpt from Sunnylven farmbook

Here is a photo that shows part of Åkergården.

Åkergården
Åkergården

The records MyHeritage found, along with the results of her DNA test, show us that Elisabeth comes from a line of loving, hardworking country folk with strong roots in Norway. We’re sure they would have been proud of what she accomplished for their homeland.