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                The Narciso Foundation Inc. (NFI) was organized for the original purpose of maintaining close ties among all family members who are direct descendants of Guillermo S. Narciso of Concepcion, Tarlac, thus enabling clan members to assist and support one another whenever necessary. NFI was officially incorporated last March 19, 1984, when its Articles of Incorporation and By-Laws were filed and registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Today,  the NFI has more than 300 members, spread out all over the Philippines and in countries such as Japan, the U.S.A., Canada, the Middle East, etc.

Guillermo S. Narciso (1867-1933)        

          Guillermo and his four brothers and two sisters were from Caluluan, Concepcion, Tarlac. His younger brothers and sisters were Julian, Gil, Teofista, Alejandro, Benita and Pablo. They were the children of Andres Narciso and Petra Salas, who were originally from a settlement now known as Magalang, Pampanga, and later migrated to the adjoining town of Concepcion, Tarlac, before Guillermo was born.

            He was educated in a Church-run parochial school up to the equivalent of high school. He was mainly self-educated thereafter because he did not have access to universities which were mostly in Manila. He spoke good Spanish as evidenced by the books he left behind. Notwithstanding this, he forbade his children from learning this foreign language because of his strong sense of nationalism.
 
          Guillermo served during the Philippine revolution against Spanish rule as a captain of Filipino rebel forces. Based on masonic paraphernalia he left behind, Guillermo was a ranking mason in his time.        

          Guillermo married Apolonia Puno, daughter of Martin Puno and Monica Maglutac, who were originally from Bacolor, Pampanga. He had six children with Apolonia, namely: Efren, Andres, Constancia, Romulo, Paz and Praxedes. He then became widowed and subsequently married Maria Dungo, daughter of Telesforo Dungo and Miguela Gutierrez whose roots were from San Luis, Pampanga. He had four children with Maria, namely: Amparo, Arsenio, Luis and Zoilo (who died in infancy).

          Guillermo acquired a homestead in Libo, Bantug, La Paz, Tarlac and constructed a house in Caricutan, a sitio of Bantug where the children with Maria spent their childhood days. The house in Caricutan was somewhat oversized for the family's immediate requirements because Guillermo wanted a big space where other people will always be welcome. As one of his surviving children recalls, there were always visitors at the house such that it frequently seemed a small party or a council meeting was going on - with "Tatang Imbo" (as Guillermo was fondly called) presiding over such events. Guillermo was also a horse-riding (perhaps carryover from his days as a soldier) and a horse-loving person and his horses were always an invitation to mischief for his young male children.        

          Of his children, Andres died while still in law school and Efren died in prime age (already working), both unmarried and with no children. The other seven children all eventually married and settled down to raise families of their own.

          Guillermo died in 1933 and his remains are buried at the Catholic cemetery in Concepcion, Tarlac.       

NFI Major Programs

          The existing major programs were conceived not only to meet basic needs but also to express a caring attitude and articulate a family belief that education is the best means to improve one's status in life.

Hospitalization / Medical assistance

          NFI members who are afflicted with major illnesses are provided with some assistance (up to a maximum of P10,000.00) to alleviate financial difficulties.

Educational Scholarships

          NFI members of schooling age who are sufficiently but whose parents are short on funds may apply for scholarship grants subject to approval by the Board of Trustees.

          Additionally, the NFI organizes the yearly family reunion to provide everybody with an opportunity for social interaction. This is usually held every December 30 during the Christmas season.

          If you have any comments or feedback about this site, please click here.       

          The site was last updated on May 18 2014, and it currently has 90 registered member(s). If you wish to become a member too, please click here.  


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Announcements:2013 Christmas message by Rolly Narciso, NFI Board of Trustees Chairman
Posted by: Roberto Jose Narciso on Dec 23 2013 09:54

Hi there guys,

The year 2013 has been full of ups and downs, triumphs and tragedies, joys and sorrows. But despite all these, there are plenty of good reasons to look forward optimistically to 2014 and beyond. At this time, I don’t know how to express Christmas greetings in a manner appropriate to this particular yuletide season. So I will instead borrow my favorite lines from a Paul Coelho book (Manuscript Found in Accra):

In the cycle of nature there is no such thing as victory or defeat; there is only movement. The winter struggles to reign supreme, but in the end is obliged to accept spring’s victory, which brings with it flowers and happiness. The summer would like to make its warm days last forever, because it believes that warmth is good for the Earth. But, in the end, it has to accept the arrival of autumn, which will allow the Earth to rest . . . . .

And within that cycle there are neither winners nor losers; there are only stages that must be gone through. When the human heart understands this, it is free and able to accept difficult times without being deceived by moments of glory. . .

Losing a battle or losing everything we thought we possessed will bring us moments of sadness. But when those moments pass, we will discover the hidden strength that exists in each of us, a strength that will surprise us and increase our self-respect. . . ..

Only he who gives up is defeated. Everyone else is victorious.

Indeed, it has been a tough year. With the guidance of the Almighty, we all can overcome these trials and move on to much better times ahead.

With these thoughts in mind, let me wish all of you a blessed Christmas and a joyous New Year!

RollyNarciso

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Important:NFI Board of Trustees Minutes of Meeting - Oct26-2013
Posted by: Roberto Jose Narciso on Dec 23 2013 09:40

NFI BOARD OF TRUSTEES

MINUTES OF MEETING – 10/26/13; 1230PM

VALLE VERDE COUNTRY CLUB (PASIG)

-------------------------------------------------------

1. ATTENDEES:

Freddy Alday, Rose Bayot, Nenet Bustos, Dharry Bustos, Dinah Lapus,

BobbyNarciso, Ted Ramos, Bay Ramos, RollyNarciso

2. DISCUSSIONS/RESOLUTIONS:

A.It was decided that the regular NFI reunion be scheduledevery two (2) years instead of every year as done before. This means that there isno NFI reunion for December 2013;the next one will be for 2014.

B.All other previous agreements will be maintained, such as:

1.the reunion will be always be onDecember 30except when the Arsenio cluster is co-hosting, in which case an alternative date will be discussed with the other co-host and announced to all NFI members in advance as to date, venue, time;

2.rotating co-hosting by five (5) clusters (Arsenio, Romulo, Luis, Carague, Ramos), with the Alday-Valencia clusters permanently paired to co-host the Concepcion venue every 3-4 turns (equivalent to 6-8 years); and

3.Metro Manila reunion site shouldpreferably be at the Philam Homes clubhouse, as started and thereafter traditionally continued by the late Tatang Seniong,except when there are compelling reasons to do it elsewhere (as was the case last December 2012).

C.In this regard, it was agreed that the followingopportunities or occasions for social inter-action will be availed of:

1.encourage more participation/communication thru the NFI website (www.myheritage.com);

2.more frequent small gatherings such as birthdays, weddings, anniversaries, binyag, fiestas, graduations, blow-outs, etc*;

3.get-together for lunch, meryenda, or dinner during short visits by balik-bayan or long-lost relatives; and

4.schedule more frequent NFI Board meetings.

D.It was also agreed, upon the reminder of NFI Treasurer Rose Bayot, that allpast-due accounts be paid right away. This will also pave the way fornew billings that are scheduled January 2014 for annual membership dues.

E.Dinah Lapus submitted the financial report on the December 2012 NFI reunion (co-hosted by the Carague and Romulo clusters) which showed, surprisingly, asurplus of P7,167.13 which was turned-over to the NFI Treasurer to bolster the NFI coffers. The Board took note of how said co-hosts avoided the usual annual deficit on the staging of this affair and commended the Carague and Romulo clusters for this feat.

F.For future planning purposes, the Board approved the suggestion that each cluster designate itsalternative representative (younger and full of energy, preferably from the next generation) to ensureattendance at all NFI Board meetings, assurecontinuity for future plans/programs, and to infusenewer/better ideas for NFI as a whole.

3. ADJOURNMENT

There being no further matters to take up, the Board meeting was adjourned at2:45PM.

Minutes taken by:

RollyNarciso

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Obituaries:Tiya Mel (1931-2013) Interment Rites Sharing by Rolly S. Narciso - Arlington Memorial Chapels, 12 February 2013
Posted by: Roberto Jose Narciso on Feb 21 2013 03:42

She was born, got baptized and grew up as Amelita Silva Rampola, with the Narciso family name appended to that in 1955 when she married Tiyo Seniong. Her nickname was either “Lita” if you are from the Rampola side or ‘Mel” if you happen to be from the Narciso side. Friends, colleagues and acquaintances called her by whichever nickname suited their fancy. It didn’t matter anyway since she was the same warm, kind and lovely lady regardless of which name you used.

I met Tiya Mel for the first time on the very day (in fact, on very occasion) she became a Narciso one fine summer day in 1955 when she exchanged “I do’s” with Tiyo Seniong and both vowed to each other “till death do us part”.

Because we (my parents, siblings and I) were residing in Butuan City, we never had the opportunity to meet Tiya Mel in person prior to said occasion. But that turned out to be unimportant because, based on informal comments, the emerging consensus was that she is an outstanding girl considering that:

· Tiyo Seniong (who was my Ninong) was known to be quite pihikan regarding relationships with girls, ready to remain an old bachelor if the right one didn’t come along. And yet, she was able to inspire him into courting her and eventually proposing a life-long partnership.

· Despite Tiyo Seniong’s conservative and no-nonsense nature, she successfully bridged their eleven-year age differential when she was yet at the fun-loving and carefree phase of her young life.

· As a law-abiding well-respected professor at UE, “Doc” A D Narciso was bound by a strict code of conduct. Uncharacteristically, he committed a major infraction by having a romantic relationship with his student. She must have been worth the grave risk of a professional censure and a public scandal!

In other words, without actually seeing her, we were already convinced that Tiyo Seniong’s special someone is truly someone special.

After the wedding, I went back to Butuan City where I was pre-enrolled for the coming school year at Grade 5, elementary level. The next opportunity for meeting Tiya Mel came six years later (at this time, she was already a mom to two sons and a daughter) after I graduated from high school and moved to Manila to pursue a college education.

Being a young (15 years old) probinsyano who didn’t know how to get around the big city, Tiyo Seniong invited me to stay with them at #2 South Maya Drive, Philam Homes, Quezon City. Instantly, Marichu was deprived of her private bedroom. That development, in turn, forced her to overcrowd the other bedroom occupied by Bobby and Gus. This of course was meant to be a temporary arrangement for the purpose of getting myself oriented to college life in a metropolitan setting. Thus, for this period, Tiyo Seniong and Tiya Mel were some kind of foster parents who provided guidance and mentoring on behalf of my own biological parents.

When enrollment time came, Tiya Mel volunteered to help me out, probably anticipating that hitches could unexpectedly arise along the way. Since my college application papers were previously submitted to UP-Diliman via registered mail, these had to be retrieved on account of a change in plans. Having accomplished that after a lengthy and diligent document search, we went to Ateneo-Loyola Heights to try our luck there. Tiya Mel and I were immediately greeted with the bad news: we were told that we came two weeks late for the required qualifiying exams, that no similar exams will be held again and that there was no way to gain admission without passing those exams. Refusing to accept the refusal, Tiya Mel pleaded my case without the belligerence of a lawyer but with the charm and persuasion of a caring parent. Upon overhearing the somewhat animated discussions, the Dean (Fr. Kunkel) intervened with a miracle of a decision – the entrance exams will be administered impromptu, i.e. right now, by the teachers who incidentally were present as they were still checking the testpapers of hundreds of applicants from two weeks ago. After three hours of gruelling tests, plus one hour for review and evaluation (including a quickie lunch), the second miracle happened when Fr. Kunkel told Tiya Mel that I was eligible for enrollment to “the toughest course in the toughest school in the land”. We went home that day quite dazed from the surprising turn of events but nonetheless feeling triumphant about it all. I thanked Tiya Mel for what she did on my behalf without revealing my creeping fears about the “toughest course” that I, in the euphoria of the moment, might have mistakenly agreed to take.

In my advancing years, as I reflect on past events, I have been increasingly convinced that my becoming an “accidental Atenean” was a major turning point in my life. And I remain thankful to Tiya Mel for the Jesuit education I obtained which culminated not only in a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree but also led to a significant shift in my personal values. Looking back, particularly when I see Bobby, Gus, Tony and Rudy, I flatter myself with the thought that this “accidental Atenean” blazed the trail which convinced their parents to make them “intentional Ateneans” right from grade school thru high school and eventually to college.

As some of you know, Tiyo Seniong was my ninong. And that made Tiya Mel, de facto, my ninang. And since Tiyo Seniong was an actual and virtual ninong to hundreds of other people, Tiya Mel automatically became a ninang to them too. On this basis, it is not difficult to visualize how many grateful people are out there – with their own interesting stories to tell, individual memorable moments to cherish and personal feelings of gratitude to express. We’ve heard some of them in the past few evenings during the six-day wake for Tiya Mel, but I’m quite sure there are many more that we haven’t known yet nor heard from.

To wind up, kindly allow me to make an observation regarding the amazing togetherness of Tiyo Seniong and Tiya Mel over the past 57 years. We’ve seen them as a couple everywhere – Sunday mass, social gatherings, socio-civic programs, business trips, visits to relatives, school events, family celebrations, etc. – always one with the other. There were just a few exceptions such as Tiyo Seniong’s golf games where Tiya Mel was absent; and Tiya Mel’s CWL activities where Tiyo Seniong as a rule can’t participate. They seem to have been made specifically for each other, as near-perfect as any pair can be, like two halves of a whole who individually would feel incomplete if the other part was missing.

For this reason, when Tiyo Seniong passed away last year, we worried about how Tiya Mel would fare. The children and grandchildren can only do so much to fill the resultant void in her life. One could almost hear Karen Carpenter singing “I won’t last a day without you”. Although she did last longer than a day, she could do so only for some 200 days without her dear other half. Last December, she experienced her first Christmas without him. The loneliness or emptiness must have been very hard to bear, such that she didn’t look forward anymore to Valentine’s Day under the same circumstances.

And so, last February 6, perhaps (according to Rudy) with the intercession of her dear-departed baby Ma. Lourdes, Tiya Mel went back to the Lord and got reunited with Tiyo Seniong. Somehow, they put a new twist to the marital vow “till death do us part” because Tiya Mel’s demise has in fact provided the means for them to be with each other once again.

In two days’ time, we can imagine them together in their heavenly version of Valentine’s Day. But then again, since they are now in a special place reserved exclusively for special people, with the grace of God, they can have their Valentine’s Day every day forever and ever.

If we were writing a love story, theirs will have the classic end-line: and they lived happily ever after. For this particular one, we can even add emphatically: for all eternity, amen.

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Obituaries:Amelita Rampola Narciso
Posted by: Roberto Jose Narciso on Feb 14 2013 00:43

On behalf of the AD Narciso cluster, thank you to all who called or sent messages of condolences through text or e-mail, a special thank you to all those who visited during the wake, sent flowers, abuloy, food or mass cards, and a special special thank you to the priests who took time off to celebrate the masses during the wake funeral.


Mama lived a full life - she was 81 years old - but I guess the pain and loneliness of continuing on without Papa who passed away eight months earlier at 91 years was just too much for her to bear. They are now happily together again, as they were throughout their 57 years of marriage.

Their matching urns (with identifying name plates lest we confuse one from the other) sit side by side in a niche in Sta. Rita Parish in Philamlife Homes, where they lived their whole lives and raised a family of 5 children who all eventually left the family nest, got married and gave them 15 grandchildren. Sadly, they did not live long enough to see their great grandchildren.

We view the passing away of both Papa & Mama as a celebration of life - for as they were together throughout their married lives on earth, we pray that they will be together as well in their eternal lives in heaven.

To Papa & Mama, happy Valentine's Day today!!

Thank you again!
Bobby
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Family memories:My Memories of Kuya Ruming Valencia by Rolly Narciso
Posted by: Roberto Jose Narciso on Jan 16 2013 19:36

Note:

Below is an interesting recount by Rolly of his experiences during his childhood days of Kuya Ruming Valencia - the eldest of the 3rd generation members of the Guillermo Narciso clan. Kuya Ruming passed away peacefully last Dec 22, 2012 at the ripe age of 83.

*****

His full name is Romeo Narciso Valencia, but he was usually addressed as Kuya Romy (in Tagalog) or Cong Ruming (in Pampango). I have always preferred to “blend” the latter two options in order to create a more universally recognizable name (particularly for the younger generations) because the Narciso network has long been geographically dispersed in Luzon, Mindanao and foreign lands (many are in California and Canada).


I actually first became aware of Kuya Ruming when I was around three years old when he frequently visited my parents (whom he called Tatang Sitong and Imang Nitang) at our residence in Manuguit Subdivision, Grace Park, Manila. Later on, I figured that he must have been taking electrical technical courses because he was trying to make his own radio unit (probably a school project) from assorted input materials that attracted my curiosity – multicolored wires, glass tubes, plugs and jacks, tiny signal lights, grey soldering wires, etc. While I was allowed to watch, as he elucidated with kiddie-talk explanations, I was forbidden from touching anything. This routine went on and off for a few months until, lo and behold, the radio unit was miraculously complete and actually functioning!


After those early encounters in Manila, I lost track of Kuya Ruming as my father moved the family to different places on his own search for a better life for all of us. But despite his non-presence, I’m quite sure that he kept in touch with my father because his name kept coming up every now and then at dinner-table conversations in Lopez (Quezon Province), Paco (Manila), Davao City and Butuan City (both in far-away Mindanao).


I was eight years old when we arrived in Butuan where I resumed my interrupted Grade 4 studies at Urios College. To supplement the family income (my father was then the regional manager for Great Pacific Life), my mother opened up a grocery store (Butuan Bay Enterprises). This was followed a year later by my father’s takeover of a gas station (Mobil Oil). When my father eventually shifted his career from management to entrepreneurship by going into the logging business, he sort of adopted four of his nephews (one is actually a niece) to help him and my mother run these new ventures “in exchange” for support for living expenses and schooling costs. Deep down, I suspected that the bigger part of the deal was for my father (supposedly the sternest uncle in the clan) to give the three guys some guidance, counseling and discipline in their “delicate and dangerous” teen years. This was the era when rebellious behavior was coming to the fore thru movie idols such as Marlon Brando, James Dean and Fernando Poe Jr. with their leather jackets and tight-fitting low-waisted denim pants. I think the heretofore unheard-of term “juvenile delinquent” was coined to describe the wayward members of this particular generation.


And so, around 1956-1958, my cousins came marching in (Kuya Angel, Kuya Ruming Kuya Nardo, Ate Lily, in that order) to live with us at T. Calo St and later at La Revolucion St. Kuya Angel was assigned to the grocery store for his accounting and supervisory capabilities. On the other hand, Kuya Ruming was posted at the gas station where he immediately demonstrated his skills in automotive repair and maintenance. As his reputation spread, the operators of the city’s for-hire vehicles (cars and jeeps) gravitated towards the gas station where the resident genius can diagnose and fix their automotive troubles in a jiffy. Because of this talent, he got sent occasionally to the logging camp upriver whenever the dozers and dumptrucks there needed urgent attention. What was amazing is that all these were attained without the benefit of a college diploma and despite his limited Bisaya vocabulary.

As an offshoot of successful results from the first service station, a second one was opened at the Agusan River catering this time to various watercrafts (e.g. tugboats, LCTs, speedboats, motorized bancas, etc). To help Kuya Ruming manage these operations, Kuya Nardo handled the administrative/financial aspects of the work.


At one time or another, all these guys became my “boss” on odd-jobs I was commanded to do (I also had to earn my keep) on weekends and school breaks. Additionally, they became my kuya-mentors on the social adjustments I had to undergo in the transition from being a kid to becoming an adolescent. Because Butuan was a frontier town with a macho environment, Ate Lily with her mahinhin manners was limited to light indoor chores and advised to concentrate on her studies. Somehow, she looked kinda young, quite fragile and a bit too proper for the Butuan of that time – supposedly an urban center but still manifesting the rough and tumble ways of a rural setting.


They each had individual strengths and weaknesses, likes and dislikes, and aspirations for the future. Kuya Ruming, in particular, made us aware of the technical side of things. For instance, he wasn’t awed by the beauty of new car models but impressed by the engine under the hood. He wasn’t amazed by the sleekness of the new speedboats in the river but preferred to monitor the fuel-efficiency of their outboard motors. He wouldn’t even allow us to enjoy music as is, insisting instead on our appreciating the amplifier, the speakers, the quality of the recording and the high-fidelity sounds they produced. Thanks to him, we learned all these things long before the stereophonic system became the fad in the 1960s and 1970s.


He was so fascinated with high-performance machines that he grabbed the very first opportunity to acquire a huge (and terribly noisy) Harley Davidson motorcycle. This vehicle he rode with pride along city streets and provincial highways as a cowboy would do with a galloping horse. This motorbike was quite unusual for the place, being only the second such unit in the entire province (Agusan Norte and Sur were still together then), the first one being used by the top honcho of the Police Traffic Department. During city parades, these two guys atop their motorbikes were often seen at the lead of a long line of students from participating schools with their respective floats, bands or drum and bugle corps.


His preferred reading material was Popular Mechanics rather than Playboy Magazine that was fancied by others his age. His favorite long-playing record was that of martial music which blared out every afternoon from the big speakers he placed at the gas station located beside Rizal Park. While I was already familiar with Frank Sinatra and The Platters, I’ve never heard of Johnny Mathis until the day Kuya Ruming played his songs over and over again, to the point that we almost memorized the words of “Chances Are” and “It’s Not For Me To Say”. I wonder how many people still remember that Kuya Ruming was a virtuoso in playing the harmonica, and how he would spend time sitting at the balcony with his harmonicas (he used four of them simultaneously) as we got treated to an evening of latin tango or chacha music and European waltzes, overtures and rhapsodies.


Despite his height and physique, it was a disappointment that he didn’t play basketball. However, he made up by becoming a superb bowling player who won awards, prizes and bets (including rounds of free beer) at the local bowling lanes.

Upon my high school graduation, I moved to Manila and visited Butuan rather infrequently. After college and post-graduate studies, I got even busier launching my own career that included foreign assignments. That’s when I lost track again of Kuya Ruming and the rest of my Butuan mentors, although I was fully aware that Kuya Angel and Kuya Nardo migrated to California and that Ate Lily became a nun.


When my parents and my siblings transfered back to Manila in 1963-1964, I was told that they left the gas station business permanently in Kuya Ruming’s hands to keep him productively pre-occupied with something that is pretty much in his sphere of interest. I further understand that Kuya Ruming decided to replant his roots in Butuan by getting married to a local lass (Ate Conching) and began raising his own brood (Vivian, Rodel, Robert, Romeo Jr., Rosabelle, Rowena and Rochelle). As the kids matured, most of them got married and, in turn, provided grandchildren who gave him immense joy which presumably made him feel young once more and ready to live life all over again.


Although he opted to stay behind in far-away Mindanao, he never forgot that he originated from Concepcion, Tarlac, as the eldest offspring of Tatang Temyong and Indang Pacing – both of them known in family circles for their low-key and mild-mannered ways. Kuya Ruming is likewise the first grandson of Guillermo Narciso (the patriarch of the Narciso clan) and Apolonia Puno of Pampanga, and such chronological fact entitled him to be addressed as “Kuya” or “Cong” depending on which dialect was used.


Last December 18, 2012, after a well-lived life that spanned eighty-three (83) years, Kuya Ruming went back to the Lord. His passing also enabled him to rejoin beloved family members and friends who have already gone ahead into the next life. We wish him a happy journey towards his new home of eternal peace and contentment. With his interment in Butuan on December 22, he has symbolically completed the replanting of his roots in the city that he learned to love and where succeeding generations of Valencias can sprout, grow and blossom in their own chosen way as they each carry out their individual missions in life. And, as they do, their Papa Romy will be caringly watching and guiding. . . . . . . . . . even if he now does so from a great distance.


As for me, all I can say is: Thank you, Kuya Ruming, for being among the early mentors in my life. Thank you likewise for the technical lectures and the music-appreciation lessons. And, now that you’ve also gone ahead, thank you too for the pleasant memories that will be left behind.

Rolly

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Announcements:2012 Guillermo Narciso family reunion
Posted by: Roberto Jose Narciso on Dec 27 2012 06:20

Message from the hosts of this year's reunion: the Carague and Romulo clusters.

Mabuhay! Please be reminded that the annual Narciso Family Reunion will be on Sunday, December 30th 2012 at Tramway Garden Buffet, Timog Ave. QC.

Party will start at 10am sharp and will last until 2pm only so please come earlier for the registration.
Adults aged 18-76: P250
Children aged 7-17: P150

Don't forget to bring gifts worth P300 for the raffle draws. Picture taking will take place after the opening prayer.

Thank you and see you there!

Dinah Yagi - Carague cluster

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Genealogy:NFI website updates
Posted by: Roberto Jose Narciso on Dec 18 2012 19:54

TO all NFI website members:

Greetings!

I have received feedback that our website, particularly the family tree, is not updated. Families have grown - either through births or marriages. Some family members have passed on. Profile pics in the family tree no longer look like the person being profiled.

The goal of the NFI website is to allow all clan members to keep in touch with each other, especially since we are scattered all over the world. You can do this by contributing articles - announcements, new births, family developments, etc., or posting pics/photo albums.

The family tree, by design, can only be updated by the website administrator (yours truly). So if you want to add a family member to your branch in the family tree, post developments about an existing member (e.g. change of address, obituary announcement, etc.) or change any profile pic, just send the info (along with any attachment) to my e-mail address bobby.narciso@gmail.com. I will make sure t...

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Obituaries:Romeo "Ruming" N. Valencia
Posted by: Roberto Jose Narciso on Dec 18 2012 19:18

Romeo "Ruming" N. Valencia of the Valencia cluster passed away on Dec 18, 2012 at around 3:37 pm and will be buried on Saturday, Dec 22, after the 1 pm funeral mass at St. Joseph Cathedral in Butuan City.

Ruming was the oldest among the 3rd generation members of the Guillermo Narciso clan.

According to his daughter, Rochelle, one of Ruming's wishes in his old age was to see his relatives again. He longed to go back to Concepcion but his health prevented him from doing so. Now that he has crossed to the Great Beyond, he'll be free to go where his heart desires. Concepcion will certainly be one of them.

We join his family in their bereavement and we pray for Ruming's eternal peace and for comfort and strength for the loved ones he left behind.

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Announcements:2011 "Fiesta Narciso" clan reunion
Posted by: Roberto Jose Narciso on Dec 14 2011 19:44

Attached is a letter of invitation from Freddie Alday, Jr. regarding this year's Guillermo Narciso clan reunion which will be held in Concepcion, Tarlac, on 30 December 2011. Hosts for this year's affair are the Alday and Valencia clusters.

We hope to see you there!

Wishing you all a safe and blessed Christmas season!!

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Announcements:2011 Narciso clan reunion
Posted by: Roberto Jose Narciso on Aug 14 2011 08:06

This year's Narciso clan reunion shall be held on Friday, December 30, 2011, at Orchard Valley in Concepcion, Tarlac. Hosts for this year's reunion are the Alday and Valencia clusters.

Please stay tuned for subsequent details from the host clusters.

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