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FAMILY IT IS TIME TO START TALKING REUNION. PUT YOUR THOUGHTS TO PAPER AND LEAVE THE BULLSHIT HOME 

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Our family tree is posted online on this site! There are 1875 names in our family site. The earliest event is the birth of <Private> Pickering (born Harm Nam) (Oct 30 68). The most recent event is the birth of <Private> Pickering (Mar 21 2009).
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Family stories:Charles Pickering (1814-1867)
Posted by: Dulcie Stewart on Nov 23 2011 23:08

1814

Charles Pickering was born in Cooma, Queanbeyan, Twofold Bay, New South Wales, Australia[1] to Charles Pickering (1786 –1837) and Catherine Burn (1788 – 1859).[2]

1829

2 January

Charles Pickering gave evidence on a trial in the Supreme Court, Clarkson v. Pickering before his Honor Mr. Justice Forbes.[3]

16 June

Charles Pickering, along with Thomas Baxter were arraigned on an assignment of perjury, whilst giving evidence on a trail in the Supreme Court of New South Wales, Clarkson v. Pickering on 2 January, 1829. Both pleaded not guilty.[4]

23 June

“Charles Pickering, the younger, was treated with an assignment of perjury, on the ground of his having given evidence in a cause tried last term, Clarkson v. Charles Pickering, senior, wherein defendant stated he had been present in Feb. 1827, at his father’s house, with a man named Baxter, at a settlement of accounts between Catherine Clarkson and Charles Pickering, the elder, when a balance of 3l. 7s. 6d. was declared owing to Mrs. Clarkson. But it was sworn on the other hand, that defendant had not been in town in Feb. 1827, nor had any settlement of accounts, as the defendant averred, ever taken place between the parties already mentioned.

Pickering’s Attorney objected to the matter being proceeded with, unless costs of the former trial were paid by the prosecutor, and quoted several cases to uphold his objection; which being invalidated by the learned Judge, defendant’s Attorney applied for a copy of the indictment, which the Court granted; and trial of the case was deferred to a future day.”[5]

3 July

Charles Pickering was indicted for perjury, in having given evidence in a case, Clarkson versus Pickering, tried in the Supreme Court on the 2nd day of January, 1829, by reason of which plaintiff lost the suit. Pickering was sworn to have used the words “that he was present in the month of February 1827, when a settlement of accounts occurred between Mrs. Clarkson and Pickering the elder, and a trifling balance was left, owing to Mrs. Clarkson.”

Several witnesses proved that Pickering, jun. was at Newcastle on the day he swore to have been present at the settlement of accounts in Sydney. The witnesses for the prosecution underwent a severe cross-examination. — Guilty”.[6]

4 July

Charles Pickering was convicted of wilful and corrupt perjury and was placed at the bar.[7]

Pickering, who was only 15, was ordered to be transported for two years, with a recommendation that he be kept apart from those who might confirm him in vice and that he be taught a useful trade.[8]

1840’s

Probably arrived in Fiji in the early 1840s.[9]

1843

Pickering was residing near Bau and had been suspected by the chief of Bau, Cakabau of spying on behalf of Rewa. Cakabau was at war with Rewa. Pickering fled to Lakemba. Cakabau sent a party to search for Pickering but on hearing this some white men from Ovalau preceded the Bau canoes[10] and offered Pickering sanctuary in Levuka. [11]

Because of this, Cakabau ordered the whole white settlement in Levuka to leave Ovalau giving them the option of either moving to Rewa or Vanua Levu.[12]

6 April – 18 May Rev. John Hunt joins Charles Pickering on a trading route around the Western parts of Fiji on the Tai Vitifor beche-der-mer. Pickering owned a small schooner Tai Viti, built by Commodore Wilkes during his 1840 visit, for this was the name given to the boat in which Hunt circumnavigated Vanualevu [13]

25 November

Schooner Jane (owned by Charles Pickering) brought letters for Methodist Missionaries on Somosomo from Vewa and Rewa.[14]

30 November

Thomas Williams (Methodist Missionary) on Somosomo sent letters to Lakemba via the Jane.[15]

1844

23 March

Cutter Black Hawk arrives in Somosomo.[16]

May or June

According to Rev. Thomas Williams[17] the schooner Jane wrecked at Cicia (Lau) in May but according to Thornley[18] the wreck happened in June.

Pickering escaped but two white men and all his trade were lost. With the help of some white

men at Levuka he managed to make his way to Rewa, where he took part in the war against Bau. This made Cakobau so angry that he drove the white people out of Levuka.

Just as the missionaries were making their way to Viwa for the District Meeting, Cakobau dropped a bombshell by ordering the white community at Levuka to leave the village. Charles Pickering, the English trader from Rewa who had taken Hunt around Viti Levu, was on voyage to Lau in June 1844 when his vessel was wrecked off Cicia.

Cakobau had always suspected Pickering of sympathies with the Rewa war party and seized the opportunity to have him detained and brought to Bau. He sent off a message to Pickering’s associates at Levuka informing them of his intentions. But he was too late. A Levuka boat picked up Pickering from Lakeba and returned him to Rewa. A furious Cakobau too his revenge against the Levuka community and ordered them all to leave Ovalau.

David Whippy hastened to Bau with a tabua seeking reconciliation but it was refused. Cakobau asked Hunt to write the necessary letter to Levuka. The people could go anywere else in Cakobau’s kingdom. They eventually resettled at Solevu in Vanua Levu. Hunt, whose friendship with the Levuka community had assisted his work, tried unsuccessfully to plead their case to Cakobau: “although we have nothing to do with this affair, yet all white people are more or less brought under censure in consequence of the suppose hostility of the Levuka men to the government of Bau”.[19]

13 July

Missionary Rev. Thomas Williams wrote in his diary that Ratu Mara (alias Kamsis) from Bau arrived on Somosomo “on his way to Lakemba most probably in search of Charley who may yet to pay dearly from his interference in the politics of Fiji”.[20]

1846

17 January

Cutter Black Hawk (owned by Charles Pickering) arrives in Somosomo.[21]

18 January

In the evening, two native women ran away from the Black Hawk. Methodist Missionary, Rev. Thomas Williams writes in his diary on the 19th:

Charles seems disposed to go without the women, and I thought the matter was settled. About 10 o’clock to my surprise there was a stir on the beach opposite the long bure, and on going out I found it originated in an attempt by some of the crew of the Black Hawk, who was sitting in a small canoe near the beach. I saw him paddle off toward the canoe, and observed several armed natives near the bure; but thought all the stir was over until I heard Pickering and Lati ni ra (a Bau chief who speaks English and is sailing with C. P.) shout out: ‘Stand back! Stand back!’ at the same time levelling their muskets at the natives near the bure. I was at a loss to know what their speaking in English could mean; but decided at once to go to the bure. As I ran along I found that there was a fierce war of words going on between Lati na ra from the cutter and the Mata and an old priest from the shore, the two latter brandishing their clubs and spears and dancing about like young men. As I approached the bure I realized the meaning of ‘Stand back’. It was addressed to two white men on shore. Towards one of them Na Mata raised and set his shoulder and pulled the trigger. His piece missed fire. He drew back the flint, took aim again, and once more it missed fire. There were not six yards between the two so that he had the piece gone off Na Mata would certainly have gone off too, for the man aimed fair at his chest.

It seems the runaway women were the property of these men who got permission from Charles to go on shore and look for them or others in their place. They had been into the new town, and were returning at the time when those on board had fixed a small carronade over the bow of the cutter intending to discharge it after their muskets. The two were to keep back so that those on board might fire fearlessly on the natives. Thus prepared to do execution Charles gave orders for the youth to paddle towards the men on shore evidently intending to fire should there be any attempt to molest him.

In the meantime I was engaged in endeavouring to assuage the anger of Na Mata and the priest; and, having in some measure succeeded, I turned to the white men who stood by, and requested them to enter the little canoe and return on board. They behaved civilly and went, one of them saying: ‘If it had not been for you, Sire, I would have shot that old chief,’ meaning Na Mata. I succeeded in persuading two or three groups who were sitting within musket range of the cutter to disperse, and, having seen the old men off the beach, and the white men off to their vessel I directed my steps home.

In the evening I walked on to Qaraisoi and learning that the men who came on shore had attempted to take one of the young King’s wives away to make up for their loss. It is but just to say that Charles’s men first appealed to the King Tuithakau requesting him to see after the women and return them; and although the King, as a matter of course, promised to seek the

women, his people, instead of doing this, only prepared themselves for fighting[22].

Williams also mentions that Filimon Taaufa (a member of the Society and a “hearer”) and his wife Louise left for Uea (Wallis Island) on Pickering’s vessel Black Hawk.[23]

1848

After his return to Rewa, Pickering joined Ngarra-ni-nggio in the war against Mbau and fled with him to the mountains after the second destruction of the town.[24]

June

Captain Ellis[25]brought with him a cargo of spirits on board the ?. Pickering was drunk in Vewa with other whites. According to Henderson, “Thakombau could have easily have caught Pickering there; but though he objected to his presence at first he decided later on not to interfere with him.”[26]

Pickering joins Lieutenant McLeo’ds company, who was sent from H.M.S. Calypso at Koro Island to avenge the murder of two whites.[27]

1849

August

In his journal, John Erskine mentions that he receives a letter from Charles Pickering who wished to meet with Erskine to explain what had happened in 1843 when he was accused by Cakobau of spying on Bau for Rewa.[28] Erskine mentions that Pickering is now living in Viwa.[29]

1850

December

Pickering is in Lakeba where he tells Rev. Richard Burdsall Lyth that the new missionary in Fiji was Joseph Waterhouse. Waterhouse arrived in Levuka on November on the John Wesley and he and his wife, Elizsbeth had gone to Viwa. Pickering also informed Lyth that an American warship was in the vicinity.[30]

1855

9 February

Pickering helps Rev. William Moore[31] and his family escape from Rewa to Bau after their home was set alight by Rewans.[32]

1857

10 June

Pickering is one of the signatories in a letter to the US Consular in Fiji, John B. Williams.[33]

1860

Robert Swanston lived with Pickering in Laucala for six months. [34]

Pickering purchases land in Davui Levu with Robert Swanston.[35]

In 1860, a visitor from Australia visited Pickering’s residence in Laucala Island in Rewa. An account of his visit was published in The Australian, 17 November in 1866.[36]

The author describes Pickering as a man of 52 or 53 years old, “rather below middle size, of a figure which betokened strength, agility, and full health, a clear active eye, and a face which you could not look at without pleasure, it appeared so full of fun, kindness, and shrewdness.”[37]

The author did not know how many ‘wives’ Pickering had but said that his house in Laucala “contained a goodly number of women and children…(who) were of various races – Fijian, Tongan or mixed Tonguese, and one white half-caste (Emily). Of the children any were babies.”[38] On his way to Kadavu, Pickering learnt of a half-caste girl, Emily, was going to be given to a Fijian man for marriage. He had known the girls deceased Scots father. According to the author, the very fact of a daughter of a white man marrying a “black savage was totally against (his) moral’s”. Rather than letting it happen, Pickering married Emily.[39]

Pickering resided on Laucala Island on the mouth of the Rewa. He had wo or three large bures. One room was a quarter of an acre in size. It had a thick layer of grass mats and this room was used for every domestic purpose and was large enough for nursing, dressing, cooking, eating, drinking and sleeping.[40]

Large meals were served three times a day with coffee served the moment a guest opened their eyes in the morning. Throughout the day large quantities of fruits are consumed, mostly coconuts and bananas. At least once or twice a day, yagona was served.[41]

On his visit to Pickering’s home, the author comes across a family bible. In it, he counted about two scores of names registered as: Date of Birth, Name of Infant, and Name of Mother. A number of the entries had been crossed out, which the author thought meant that they had died.[42]

1861

Pickering purchases land on his own.[43]

1864

Pickering writes to British Consul Owens, asking him to send his apologies to Father Jean Baptiste Breheret[44], for his ‘behaviour’, whatever it was, which he put down to being ‘under the influence of intoxicating liquors’.[45]

21 October

The British Consulate writes to Pickering with reference to a claim made against him by C. Robinson for $139.46 being the balance of an account rendered. The Consulate states that he had receipts for payments made by Pickering to C. Robinson of $60.60, which reduced the claimed amount to $78.90. However other payments were still due (repair of Pickering’s boat). The Consulate advised Pickering that they each get an arbitrator to adjudicate the matter. [46]

1867

July

Charles Pickering dies without making a will.[47]


[1] New South Wales Registry of Births, Deaths & Marriages http://www.bdm.nsw.gov.au/familyHistory/search.htm

[2] Norman Stevens, personal communication, 2005

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Division of Law, Macquarie University (n.d.) http://www.law.mq.edu.au/scnsw/Cases1829-30/html/r_v_pickering_and_baxter__1829.htm. Note: Mr. Solicitor Keith and Mr. Rowe appeared for the defence and Mr. Sydney Stephen for the prosecution.

[7] Supreme Court. (1829, July 7). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803-1842), p. 2. Retrieved December 10, 2010, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2192842

[9] Young, John. (1984) Adventurous spirits: Australian migrant society in pre-cession Fiji page 50.

[10] Erskine, John. (1853). Journal of a cruise among the islands of the western Pacific: including the Feejees and others inhabited by the Polynesian negro races, in Her Majesty’s ship Havannah page 174.

[11] Young, John. (1984) Adventurous spirits: Australian migrant society in pre-cession Fiji page 59.

[12] Erskine, John. (1853). Journal of a cruise among the islands of the western Pacific: including the Feejees and others inhabited by the Polynesian negro races, in Her Majesty’s ship Havannah page 174.

[13] Thornley, Andrew. (2000). The inheritance of hope: John Hunt : apostle of Fiji page 235-238.

[14] Henderson, M (1931) The journal of Thomas Williams : missionary in Fiji, 1840-1853 page 210.

[15] Ibid., page 211.

[16] Ibid., page 263. Williams mentions later (17th September, 1846) that Pickering owns the cutter Black Hawk.Note: Need to confirm when Pickering owned Black Hawk.

[17] Ibid., page 240-241.

[18] Thornley, Andrew. (2000). The inheritance of hope: John Junt : apostle of Fiji. Page 263.

[19] Ibid., Page 263.

[20] Ibid., Page 280 In the footnotes, Henderson states that the Charley Williams mentions is Charles Pickering.

[21] Ibid., page 337.

[22] Ibid., page 337-339.

[23] Ibid., page 339. Note: Need to confirm if the Black Hawk sailed to Wallis Island or the Taau’fa’s got off somewhere else in Fiji and boarded another boat for Wallis Island.

[24] Ibid., page 280.

[25] Ibid., page 303. According to Henderson, Captain Ellis “brought a cargo of liquor to Viwa in May 1848 and sold it to the whites who forthwith gave themselves over to an orgy of drunkenness. Charles Pickering was one of them.”

[26] Ibid., page 280.

[27] Ibid., page 280 The H.M.S. Calypso arrived on 12 June, 1848.

[28] Erskine, John. (1853). Journal of a cruise among the islands of the western Pacific: including the Feejees and others inhabited by the Polynesian negro races, in Her Majesty’s ship Havannah page 195.

[29] Ibid., page 195.

[30] Heath, Laurel. (1987). Matai-ni-mate: carpenter of sickness : The Reverend Richard Bursdall Lyth, M.R. C. S., L. S. A. and the Wesleyan Mission in Fiji : a case study in mission contract relationships in pre-cession Fiji 1839 – 1854. Page 88. Note: Check Lyth, 21 November to 26 December 1850 Mitchell Library B539. Page 157.

[31] Rev. William more was a Methodist missionary. He served chiefly at Rewa, which he reopened as a mission station in 1854, but also at Bua, Nadi, Kadavu, Bau and Ovalau.

[32] Thornley, Andrew and Vulaono, Tauga. (2002). Exodus of the I Taukei: the Wesleyan Church in Fiji, 1848-74. Page 76-77. http://books.google.com.au/books?id=amxNa5Mx1E8C&lpg=PA77&dq=Charles%20Pickering%20Fiji&pg=PA77#v=onepage&q=Charles%20Pickering%20&f=false

[33] United States. Consulate (Lauthala, Fiji). Despatches from United States consuls in Lauthala, 1844-1890 [microform]. From University of Queensland Fryer Library. Call No.: MIC3128.

[34] United States. Department of of State (1902). Memorandum on Fiji land claims. page 63.

[35] Young, J. (1984) Adventurous spirits: Australian migrant society in pre-cession Fiji. page 52.

[36] Young, J. (1984) Adventurous spirits: Australian migrant society in pre-cession Fiji. page 51.

[37]The Perth Gazette and West Australia Times. In the South Seas: the first white settlers in Fiji (From The Australasian). Friday 15 March 1867. Page 3. Note: Article was originally published in the Australasian, 17 November 1866. According to John Young in Adventurous spirits: Australian migrant society in pre-cession Fiji, the writer first visited Pickering in 1860.

[38] Ibid.

[39] Ibid.

[40] Ibid.

[41] Ibid.

[42] Ibid.

[43] Young, J. (1984) Adventurous spirits: Australian migrant society in pre-cession Fiji. page 52.

[44] Father Jean Baptiste Breheret was a French Roman Catholic Marist Priest who had been in Fiji since 1844. Source: Heath, Laurel. (1987). Matai-ni-mate: carpenter of sickness : The Reverend Richard Bursdall Lyth, M.R. C. S., L. S. A. and the Wesleyan Mission in Fiji : a case study in mission contract relationships in pre-cession Fiji 1839 – 1854. Page 88.

[45] Young, J. (1984) Adventurous spirits: Australian migrant society in pre-cession Fiji. page 52.

[46] Great Britain. Colonial Office. Consulate (Lauthala, Fiji). Fiji. Correspondence, entry books of letters from Secretary of State [microform]. From University of Queensland Fryer Library. Call No.: ?.

[47] Young, J. (1984) Adventurous spirits: Australian migrant society in pre-cession Fiji. page 52.

Other information with no dates:

Pickering has a bechc-de-mer establishment with London born John Humphrey Danford (also known as ‘Harry the Jew’). But after some months the drying-house is burnt down by natives and Pickering is angered by this so he takes everything away from Danford.

Seemann, Berthold. (1862). Viti: an account of a government mission to the Vitian or Fijian Islands. http://books.google.com.au/books?id=Fb8iAAAAMAAJ&dq=charles%20pickering%20fiji&pg=PA100#v=onepage&q=charles%20pickering%20fiji&f=false

References

Division of Law, Macquarie University (n.d.). R. v. Pickering and Baxter (1829) NSW Sel Cas (Dowling) 205; [1829] NSWSupC 44 http://www.law.mq.edu.au/scnsw/Cases1829-30/html/r_v_pickering_and_baxter__1829.htm

Erskine, John. (1853). Journal of a cruise among the islands of the western Pacific: including the Feejees and others inhabited by the Polynesian negro races, in Her Majesty’s ship Havannah.

Heath, Laurel. (1987). Matai-ni-mate: carpenter of sickness : The Reverend Richard Bursdall Lyth, M.R. C. S., L. S. A. and the Wesleyan Mission in Fiji : a case study in mission contract relationships in pre-cession Fiji 1839 – 1854.

Henderson, M (1931) The journal of Thomas Williams : missionary in Fiji, 1840-1853.

New South Wales Registry of Births, Deaths & Marriages http://www.bdm.nsw.gov.au/familyHistory/search.htm

Seemann, Berthold. (1862). Viti: an account of a government mission to the Vitian or Fijian Islands. http://books.google.com.au/books?id=Fb8iAAAAMAAJ&dq=charles%20pickering%20fiji&pg=PA100#v=onepage&q=charles%20pickering%20fiji&f=false

Supreme Court. (1829, July 7). The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, p. 2. Retrieved 10 December 10 2010, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2192842

The Perth Gazette and West Australia Times. In the South Seas: the first white settlers in Fiji (From The Australasian). Friday 15 March 1867. Retrieved 9 July 2009, from http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/3749185

Thornley, Andrew. (2000). The inheritance of hope: John Junt : apostle of Fiji.

Thornley, Andrew and Vulaono, Tauga. (2002). Exodus of the I Taukei: the Wesleyan Church in Fiji, 1848-74.

United States. Consulate (Lauthala, Fiji). Despatches from United States consuls in Lauthala, 1844-1890 [microform]. From University of Queensland Fryer Library. Call No.: MIC3128.

Young, J. (1984) Adventurous spirits: Australian migrant society in pre-cession Fiji.

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Family stories:First Pickering to Fiji
Posted by: James Pickering on June 13 2008 19:21
The first Pickering to Fiji was Charles Pickering, son of Charles Pickering (England) and Catherine Burn (Dublin, both convicts transported to Sydney in 1807 & 1809 respectively. He was born in 1814 in Twofold Bay (Eden) on the far south coast of NSW. A whaling community. His parents were married in 1818 in Newcastle, the same year his sister Mary Ann was born. Charles Snr was convicted at the Norwich Assizes in 1806.

In 1827 young Charles was charged and convicted with perjury in Sydney town when he gave evidence in support of a claim his father made in relation to monies supposedly paid to a Mrs Clarckson.

"Pickering, who was only 15, was ordered to be transported for two years, with a recommendation that he be kept apart from those who might confirm him in vice and that he be taught a useful trade: Sydney Gazette, 7 July 1829; Australia, 8 July 1829." from the trial. See link below for trial transcript:

http://www.law.mq.edu.au/scnsw/Cases1829-30/html/r_v_pickering_and_baxter__1829.htm

I haven't found where he served his 'transportation'. It could have been any of the various penal settlements in the colony. He next turns up in the records when he marries in Rewa, Fiji in early 1830's.

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Announcements:Reunion
Posted by: James Pickering on May 31 2008 07:06

We would appreciate it if you could all give ideas as to how you want it to happen. We have to keep this as our focal point.

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