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Abraham Bledsoe

Born:Mar 15 1673 In:
Died:May 29 1753 (at age 80)In:
Info
Events
Timeline

Immediate family

Katherine Bledsoe (born Ball)
His wife
Isaac Bledsoe
His son
Thomas Bledsoe
His son
Abraham Bledsoe
His son
Catherine Bledsoe
His daughter
George Bledsoe
His son
William Bledsoe
His son
Anthony Jennings Bledsoe
His son
Sarah Bledsoe (born Cave)
His wife
Jacob Bledsoe
His son
John Bledsoe
His son
Aaron Bledsoe
His son
Moses Bledsoe
His son
Sarah Bledsoe
His daughter
Ann Bledsoe
His daughter
Elizabeth Bledsoe
His daughter
George Bledsoe
His father
Anne Bledsoe (born Jennings)
His mother
Elizabeth Bledsoe
His sister
Sarah Bledsoe
His sister
William E. Bledsoe
His brother
John Bledsoe
His brother
George Bledsoe
His brother
Thomas Bledsoe
His brother

Source citations

Matched to: Abraham Bledsoe
Date: Mar 17 2009
Citation text:
Added by confirming a Smart Match
Matched to: Abraham Bledsoe
Date: Mar 17 2009
Citation text:
Added by confirming a Smart Match
Matched to: Abraham Bledsoe
Date: Apr 12 2009
Citation text:
Added by confirming a Smart Match

Biography

Abraham Bledsoe

1673-1753

Abraham Bledsoe was the eldest son of George Bledsoe. He was one of two sons who carried forward the Bledsoe name in America. The other was his brother Williams. There is no evidence that his brothers John, George or Thomas ever married or had descendants. Abraham was born in North Cumberland Virginia. He married Katherine Ball daughter of Thomas Ball (another prominent pioneer). Their children were Isaac, Thomas, Abraham, Catherine, George, and William. Katherine died in 1718. Abraham married again in 1723. His second wife was Sarah Cave. She was the mother of JOHN, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, Sarah, Anne, and Elizabeth. Records indicate that George's children and grandchildren spent a great deal of time in court over disputes about land and inheritances. Records also indicate that the Bledsoes for the first three generations were mainly involved in raising tobacco as their cash crop. During Abraham's lifetime, we find the family spreading out from Virginia to North Carolina. Abraham died in Granville North Carolina.

Abraham Bledsoe, son of the George Bledsoe, mentioned above, was the father of Colonels Anthony and Isaac, and of Abraham Bledsoe, who played important parts in the early history of Southwestern Virginia and the Cumberland country in Tennessee.

Abraham - Mulatto Slave

Written by Jay Guy Cisco

From Historic Sumner County, Tennessee

1909

Retyped with some revisions for the Sumner Co. TNGenWeb page by Diane Payne

Another name that deserves to be remembered is that of Abraham, a mulatto belonging to Colonel Anthony Bledsoe. General Hall said of him: "He was a brave, active and intelligent fellow, and indeed a good soldier and marksman." He seems to have been a general favorite with the whites. He was ever ready and anxious for a brush with the Indians, and more than one of them met death before him unerring rifle. What became of him I am unable to say. Doubtless his remains were mingled with the soil he so bravely helped to defend, and from which he helped to clear the primitive forest. General Hall gives, in his "Narrative," the following example of the bravery of Abraham: "He was passing one evening from the Lick fort up to Greenfield, when right in the thick canebrake he met two Cherokee chiefs of note, "Mad Dog" and "John Taylor" the latter a half-breed, well known in Nashville before the war broke out, and who could talk good English. They had been on a visit to the Shawnees; and having sent on their warriors, they were on their way by themselves to steal horses and murder any settler who might fall in their way. Abraham met them about ten paces off, and instantly drawing up his gun, he shot Mad Dog dead in his tracks, turning himself at once and feeling after his exploit.

The will of Abraham Bledsoe was dated March 15, 1753, in Granville County, and was probated on May 29 of the same year. He names his wife, Sarah, his sons Isaac, Abraham, Thomas, Jacob, Moses and Aaron, and refers to "the rest of my children." The executors were his wife, Sarah, and his son-in-law, Henry Thornton.

Abraham, Anthony, William and George Bledsoe, noted Indian fighters, who removed from Augusta to Washington county, Virginia, at an early date, were probably cousins of Anthony, Isaac and Abraham Bledsoe, who settled in Tennessee. One of the four brothers, Abraham, had sons, Thomas, Loven, Anthony, William and Isaac. The last named, Isaac, has a son, Austin Bledsoe, now living at Blackwater, Virginia

Abraham Bledsoe

1673-1753

 

Abraham Bledsoe was the eldest son of George Bledsoe. He was one of two sons who carried forward the Bledsoe name in America. The other was his brother Williams. There is no evidence that his brothers John, George or Thomas ever married or had descendants. Abraham was born in North Cumberland Virginia. He married Katherine Ball daughter of Thomas Ball (another prominent pioneer). Their children were Isaac, Thomas, Abraham, Catherine, George, and William. Katherine died in 1718. Abraham married again in 1723. His second wife was Sarah Cave. She was the mother of JOHN, Jacob, Moses, Aaron, Sarah, Anne, and Elizabeth. Records indicate that George's children and grandchildren spent a great deal of time in court over disputes about land and inheritances. Records also indicate that the Bledsoes for the first three generations were mainly involved in raising tobacco as their cash crop. During Abraham's lifetime, we find the family spreading out from Virginia to North Carolina. Abraham died in Granville North Carolina.

Abraham Bledsoe, son of the George Bledsoe, mentioned above, was the father of Colonels Anthony and Isaac, and of Abraham Bledsoe, who played important parts in the early history of Southwestern Virginia and the Cumberland country in Tennessee.

 

Abraham - Mulatto Slave

 

Written by Jay Guy Cisco

From Historic Sumner County, Tennessee

1909

 

Retyped with some revisions for the Sumner Co. TNGenWeb page by Diane Payne

 

Another name that deserves to be remembered is that of Abraham, a mulatto belonging to Colonel Anthony Bledsoe. General Hall said of him: "He was a brave, active and intelligent fellow, and indeed a good soldier and marksman." He seems to have been a general favorite with the whites. He was ever ready and anxious for a brush with the Indians, and more than one of them met death before him unerring rifle. What became of him I am unable to say. Doubtless his remains were mingled with the soil he so bravely helped to defend, and from which he helped to clear the primitive forest. General Hall gives, in his "Narrative," the following example of the bravery of Abraham: "He was passing one evening from the Lick fort up to Greenfield, when right in the thick canebrake he met two Cherokee chiefs of note, "Mad Dog" and "John Taylor" the latter a half-breed, well known in Nashville before the war broke out, and who could talk good English. They had been on a visit to the Shawnees; and having sent on their warriors, they were on their way by themselves to steal horses and murder any settler who might fall in their way. Abraham met them about ten paces off, and instantly drawing up his gun, he shot Mad Dog dead in his tracks, turning himself at once and feeling after his exploit.

 

The will of Abraham Bledsoe was dated March 15, 1753, in Granville County, and was probated on May 29 of the same year. He names his wife, Sarah, his sons Isaac, Abraham, Thomas, Jacob, Moses and Aaron, and refers to "the rest of my children." The executors were his wife, Sarah, and his son-in-law, Henry Thornton.

 

Abraham, Anthony, William and George Bledsoe, noted Indian fighters, who removed from Augusta to Washington county, Virginia, at an early date, were probably cousins of Anthony, Isaac and Abraham Bledsoe, who settled in Tennessee. One of the four brothers, Abraham, had sons, Thomas, Loven, Anthony, William and Isaac. The last named, Isaac, has a son, Austin Bledsoe, now living at Blackwater, Virginia

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