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Sir Thomas Billing

Born:Circa 1395 In:
Died:May 5 1481 (at age ‎~86‏)In:
Info
Events
Timeline

Immediate family

Catherine Billing (born Gifford)
His wife
Nicholas Billing
His son
Mary Billing (born Wesenham)
His wife
John Billing
His father
    

Work

Solicitor
1453

Source citations

Confidence: Questionable reliability of evidence
Date: Nov 2 2011
Citation text:

New England Ancestors

Entries: 76369 Updated: Sat Aug 25 23:03:25 2001 Contact: NancyAnn Norman (NancyAnnNorman@yahoo.com)

•ID: I2251

•Name: Thomas BILLING

•Prefix: Sir

•Sex: M

•Birth: Abt 1420

•Burial: Bittlesden Abbey,Oxfordshire,England

•IDNO: 306176

•Note:

Genealogy of William Billing, by Frank Billings, page 44.

Sir Thomas Billing, the eldest son of John Billing, of Rowell, was of the Inns of Court and was called to the bar. He made Sergeant-at Law in 1453, and was knighted in 1458 for taking a prominent part with the Lancastrian party. When the right to the court was argued (1466), he appeared at the bar of the House of Lords as councel for Henry VI, leading the Attorney and Solicitor General. He was the principal law advisor to Edward IV, and in 1565 was made Jusitce of the King's Bench, and in 1468 Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench. In the spring of the year 1481, he was struck with apoplexy and expired in the few days after a tenure of office for seventeen years in the mist of civil wars and revolutions. He was buried in Bittlesden Abbey in Oxfordshire, where a large blue marble slab was placed over his body, having on it the figures, in brass, of himself and his lady. He is represented in his official robes. This slab and the slab that covered his son Thomas were taken from the Abbey after the dissolution of monasteries and placed at the upper end of the center aisle of Wappenham Church, where they now remain.

Sir Thomas, by his first wife Catherine, daughter of Roger Giffold of Twyford in Buckinghamshire, Esquire, became possessed of Gifford's Manor, in the hamlet of Astwell and parish of Wappenham in Northamptonshire, afterwards calling Billing's Manor, where he took up his residence. The ancient manor house, although much curtailed in size, is still standing, and now occupied as a farmhouse.

The children of Sir Thomas, all by his first wife, were: Thomas, his heir, who succeeded to the estates in Astwell, and died on the 23rd of March, 1508/9, leaving four daughters, coheiresses, by whose marriage the large estates of the Billings passed into other families.

•Change Date: 19 JAN 2000 at 11:14:14

 

Father: John BILLING b: in Rowell,England

Marriage 1 Catherine GIFFORD

Children

1. Thomas BILLING

2. John BILLING

3. Roger BILLING

4. William BILLING

5. Nicholas BILLING

6. Katherine BILLING

7. Isabel BILLING

8. Margaret BILLING
Source: Wikipedia
Confidence: Questionable reliability of evidence
Date: Nov 2 2011
Citation text:

Thomas BillingFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search

Sir Thomas Billing (died 1481) was an English judge and Chief Justice of the King’s Bench.

Early life and career

Billing is said by Fuller to have been a native of Northamptonshire, where two villages near Northampton bear his name, and to have afterwards lived in state at Ashwell in that county. Lord Campbell says he was an attorney's clerk; but this seems doubtful. He was, at any rate, a member of Gray's Inn. Writing to one Ledam, Billing says : 'I would ye should do well, because ye are a fellow of Gray's Inn, where I was fellow ' (Paston Letters, i. 43, 53), and, according to a Gray's Inn manuscript, he was a reader there. His social position was sufficient to enable him to be on terms of intimacv with the families of Paston and of Baron Grey de Ruthyn. In 1448 he was member of parliament for London, and was recorder in 1451. Along with seven others he received the coif as serjeant-at-law 2 January 1453-4, and in the Hilary term of that year is first mentioned as arguing at the bar. Thenceforward his name is frequent in the reports.

King’s serjeant

Lord-chancellor Waynflete appointed him king's Serjeant 21 April 1458, and Lord Campbell, citing an otherwise unknown pamphlet of Billing in favour of the Lancastrian cause, says that with the attorney-general and solicitor-general he argued the cause of King Henry VI at the bar of the House of Lords. The entry in the Parliamentary Rolls, however, indicates that the judges and king's Serjeants excused themselves from giving an opinion in the matter. About the same time Billing appears to have been knighted, and on the accession of Edward IV his patent of king's Serjeant was renewed, and in the first parliament of this reign he was named, along with Serjeants Lyttelton and Laken, a referee in a cause between the Bishop of Winchester and some of his tenants. He is said by Lord Campbell to have exerted himself actively against King Henry, Queen Margaret, and the Lancastrians, and to have helped to frame the act of attainder of Sir John Fortescue, chief justice of the king's bench, for being engaged in the Battle of Towton, and to have advised the grant of a pardon, on condition that the opinions of the treatise ‘De Laudibus’ should be retracted.

Judge of the King's Bench

At any rate, in 1464 (9 Aug.), Billing was added to the three judges of the king's bench, but by the king's writ only: and the question being thereupon raised, it was decided that a commission in addition to the writ was required for the appointment of a justice of assize. Baker in his Chronology,' and Hale in his ‘Pleas of the Crown,' says that on the trial of Walter Walker for treason in 1460, for having said to his son, 'Tom, if thou behavest thyself well, I will make thee heir to the Crown' i.e. of the Crown Inn, of which he was landlord, Billing ruled a conviction, and Lord Campbell accepts the story. But it would seem from the report of the judgment of Chief-justice Bromley in the trial of Sir Nicholas Throckmorton, 17 April 1554, that the judge at that trial was John Markham, afterwards chief justice next before Billing, and that he directed an acquittal.

Chief Justice of the King’s Bench

Billing succeeded Markham as chief justice of the king's bench 23 January 1468-9, having precedence over Yelverton and Bingham, justices of the king's bench; and this office he retained in spite of political changes. For when Henry VI for a few months regained the throne new patents were at once issued, 9 October 1470; and when Edward IV overthrew him, 17 June 1471, he, along with almost all the other judges, was confirmed in his seat. It is suggested that he may have owed this less to his legal talents than to the support of the Earl of Warwick. In 1477 Billing tried Burdet of Arrow, Warwickshire, a dependent of the Duke of Clarence, for treason, committed in 1474, in saying of a stag, 'I wish that the buck, horns and all, were in the king's belly,' for which he was executed. Billing is also said to have been concerned in the trial of the Duke of Clarence himself. He continued to sit in court until 5 May 1481, when he died and was buried in Bittlesden Abbey. His tombstone is now in Wappenham Church, Northamptonshire. His successor was Sir William Hussey.

Family life

He was twice married, first to Katerina, who died 8 March 1479, second to Mary, daughter and heir of Robert Wesenham of Conington, Huntingdonshire, who had previously been married to Thomas Lang, and then to William Cotton of Redware, Staffordshire. She died in 1499, and was buried in St. Margaret's, Westminster, which she and Sir Thomas Billing had rebuilt. By his first wife he had issue four daughters and five sons, one of whom, Thomas, his heir, died in 1500 without male issue, and was buried with his father and mother.

References

This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: "Billing, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.
Confidence: Questionable reliability of evidence
Date: Nov 2 2011
Citation text:

BILLING, Thomas, [Sir]

b. ABT 1395

Northampton,England

d. May 05 1481

e. Burial

1481

Bittlesden Abbey,Oxfordshire,England

m. LIVING

m. GIFFARD, Catherine

Date: Nov 8 2011
Citation text:
Added by confirming a Smart Match

Biography

Knight, Lord Chief Justice of England.

Eldest son of John...was of the Inns of Court and was called to the bar; made Sergeant-at-law in 1453, and knighted in 1458 for taking a prominent part with the Lancastrian party. When the right of the crown was argued (1466), he appeared at the bar of the House of Lords as counsel for Henry VI, leading the Attorney and Solicitor General. He was the principal law adviser to Edward IV, and in 1463 was made Justice of the King's Bench, and in 1468 Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench. In the spring of that year he was struck with apoplexy, and expired in a few days after a tenure in office for seventeen years in the midst of civil wars and revolution. He was buried in Bittlesdan Abbey in Oxfordshire, where a large blue marble slab was placed overhis body, having on it the figures, in brass, of himself and his lady. He is represented in his official robes. This slab and the slab that covered his son Thomas were taken from the Abbey after the dissolution of monistaries and placed at the upper end of the Wappenham Church, where they now remain.

Sir Thomas, by his first wife catherine, daughter of Roger Giffard of Twyford in Buckinghamshire, Esquire, became possessed of Gifford's Manor, in the Hamlet of Astwell, and parish of Wappenham in Northamptonshire, afterwards called Billing's Manor, where he took up his residence. The ancient manor house, although much curtailed in size in still standing (1861), and now occupied as a farm-house.

The second wife of Sir Thomas Billing was Mary, daughter and heir of Robert Wesenham of Conington, Huntingdonshire, Esquire, and widow of Thomas Lacy and William Cotton. She died on the 14th of March, 1499, and was buried in the south asile of St. Margaret's Church at Westminster, a great portion of which church was rebuilt by herself and her husband, Sir Thomas Billing. A monument was there erected in her honor.

The children of Sir Thomas Billing, all by his first wife, were: Thomas, his heir, who succeeded to the estate in Astwell, and died on 23d of March, 1508-9, leaving four daughters, coheiresses, by whose marriages the large estates of the Billings passed into other families; John, who settled in Buckinghamshire; Roger, of whom nothing is known; William, who probably settled in Wedon Beck; Nicholas, Katherine, Isabel, Margaret.
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