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William Claiborne

Born:1587 In:
Died:1677 (at age ‎~90‏)In:
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Immediate family

Elizabeth Claiborne (born Butler (Boteler))
His wife
William Claiborne II
His son
Edmund Claiborne
His father
Grace Claiborne (born Bellingham)
His mother
    

Biography

William Claiborne, an ancestor of Nancy Melvina Skaggs, was Treasurer, Surveyor General, Deputy Governor and Secretary of the Colony of Virginia, and a member of the Virginia Assembly. His portrait hangs in the Capitol in Richmond.

William Claiborne has a direct line of descent from Malcolm I of Scotland (943-954 AD), according to Earl Davis Smith in" Forebears and Kin of JohnTyson Smith and Nancy Melvina Skaggs", 1972). However, that line of descent is based on Earl Davis Smith's belief that William was the son of Edmund Claiborne and Grace Bellingham, which has come into doubt in recent years. William's wife Elizabeth Boteler (Butler) has a direct line of descent from David I of Scotland (d. 1153 AD), as documented in "The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants ", by Gary Boyd Roberts, 1993, which does NOT show Wlliam Claiborne to be desended from Royalty..

"Suite 101" carries the following statement about William Claiborne:

Claiborne was from Kent County, England, where his father and grandfather had been King’s Lynn mayor. ( NOTE - that would be THOMAS Claiborne and not Edmund) He arrived with Sir Francis Wyatt, newly appointed Virginia governor. Claiborne was provided 20 pounds to fund purchase of his instruments and books (which he was to pass on to his successor), was to have a house provided for him by the Virginia Company and was to be paid 30 pounds per annum “in two hundred waight of Tobacco or any other valuable Comoditie growinge in that Country…”

Claiborne Becomes Influential Virginian

This young man was to have a long, important and productive life in Virginia. In 1625, Claiborne was named to the Governor’s Council and in 1626 was elevated to Secretary of State. He held the position until 1637, then again between 1652 and 1660. He was named the colony’s treasurer in 1642.

Claiborne’s success in fighting hostile Indians earned him the rank of colonel. In 1625, he was granted 150 acres in Elizabeth City (later Hampton), where he established the post used as a base for fur trading with the Indians. He also purchased Kent Island from the Indians to establish another trading post, but England’s king included it in the Calvert land grant for Maryland.

Claiborne lived to age 90 and probably had three wives; documentation is incomplete. It is generally agreed that he was married to Elizabeth Butler. Persons seeking details about his wives and children are advised to contact the National Society of Claiborne Family Descendants.

Read more at Suite101: Descent from Col. William Claiborne (1587-1677)

Suite101 http://suite101.com/article/descent-from-col-william-claiborne-15871677-a108812#ixzz2JlJkfJO9

My Southern Family

Hon. William CLAIBORNE 1s Sec Commonwealth of VA

10 Aug 1600 - ABT 1676

ID Number: I31616

TITLE: Hon.

OCCUPATION: Merchant

RESIDENCE: ENG & MD & King Willliam Co. VA

BIRTH: 10 Aug 1600, Crayford, Kent, ENG

DEATH: ABT 1676, New Kent or King Wm Cos. Virginia [S1386]

BURIAL: Romancocke, near West Point, VA

RESOURCES: See: [S812] [S1386] [S1824] [S2013] [S2651]

Father: Thomas CLAIBORNE (CLEYBORNE)

Mother: SARA SMYTH

Family 1 : Elizabeth Jane BUTLER

MARRIAGE: ABT 1635, London, England

1st White Settler in what is now known as the State of Maryland. AMERICAN COLONISTS IN ENGLISH RECORDS by George Sherwood. p. 182: In the Principal Probate Registry, London P.C.C. 202 EDMONDS. 1746, May 16: CLAIBORNE, William of Virginia, at present in London, merchant, confirms his will made in Virginia..

"Virginia Venturer" William Claiborne 1600-1677, by Nathaniel C. Hale, copyright 1951. (A Historical Biography.) In this book he states that "William Claiborne, colonial Virginia's first Secretary of State by royal appointment, was a native of Kent England. He was baptized in the Parish of Crayford on August 10th of the year 1600"... he goes on to say "In one of the strangest cases of mistaken identity in our colonial history this enterprising son of an English merchant family has been confused with a distant cousin of the same name." ... Supposedly this William (the distant cousin) was the son of Edmund of Westmoreland County in England. He says (our)"William, the colonial, was the son of Thomas Clayborne of Kent, and a grandson of Thomas Cleyborne, the Elder of the Borough of King's Lynn in Norfolk."

CLAIBORNE OF VA, DESCENDANTS OF COLONEL WILLIAM CLAIBORNE, THE FIRST EIGHT GENERATIONS, compiled by John Frederick Dorman, 1995, is quoted "WILLIAM CLAIBORNE son of Thomas Cleyborne of Crayford, Kent,Gentleman, and Sara Smith-James."

When Roger James died in 1596, Sarah Smyth m. (2) Thomas Claiborne, Mayor of the Borough of King's Lynn 1592, becoming the parents, among others, of Col. William Claiborne.

Father: Thomas CLEYBORNE

Mother: Sarah Smyth JAMES

Family 1: Elizabeth BUTLER

MARRIAGE: ABT. 1635, ?

1.Mary Rice CLAIBORNE

"In 1981, the Genealogical Publishing Company, under the title GENEALOGIES OF VIRGINIA FAMILIES, reprinted in five volumes all of the genealogy articles which had previously appeared in the VIRGINIA MAGAZINE OF HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY, a copy of which I found at a local genealogy library. The first 75 or so pages of Volume II are reprints of several articles pertaining to the Claiborne family including Clayton Torrence's two-part article entitled "The English Ancestry of William Claiborne of Virginia." Two things make this article must reading for any Claiborne researcher -- (1) the extent to which Torrence researches William Claiborne's immediate family and English ancestry; and (2) his complete documentation of source material including citings from that material.

Torrence proves William Claiborne of Virginia was the son of Thomas Cleyborne and his wife Sara (Smith) James, widow of Roger James, of the Parish of Crayford, county Kent, England. Baptised August 10, 1600, William Claiborne m. c1635 Elizabeth Butler/Boteler, daughter of John and Jane (Elliott) Boteler of Roxwell, county Essex, England.

Regarding the children of William and Elizabeth (Butler) Claiborne, Torrence identifies five children -- William, Thomas, Leonard, John and Jane -- and provides the evidence for each. Regarding other, unnamed, children, Torrence writes:

"That the aforesaid William, Thomas, Leonard, John and Jane (Mrs. Thomas Brereton) were children of the Honorable William Claiborne (1600-circa 1677/8) is established fact, the evidence for each child being stated above. That the mother of these five children was Elizabeth Butler is established by the fact that we have in note 45 established the fact that the Honorable William Claiborne (1600-circa 1677/8) had only one wife, whom we have proved to have been Elizabeth Butler."

"There is no evidence that the Honorable William Claiborne (1600-circa 1677/8) and his wife Elizabeth Butler had other children (at least who survived infancy or childhood) than William, Thomas, Leonard, John and Jane, named above.""

Martha WAR12051@aol.com Wrote: John Herbert Claiborne, MD wrote in "William Claiborne of VA" William Claiborne who was the first Secretary of the Commonwealth of VA was b. 1587 and d. 1677, New Kent Co and was buried at Romancocke, near West Point, VA on the banks of the York River. The book delt primarily with William Claiborne's fued with Lord Baltimore over Kent Island off the Maryland coast. In one place it is noted 1677, when he made his final appeal with respect to Kent Island, his name is shown as William Claiborne, Sr. and it is also noted he had a son named Leonard and a daughter named Jane. There was mention that William Claiborne MAY have married a second time. There is a will filed in King William in 1705 by William Claiborne which mentions, "his son William Claiborne, cousin Thomas Claiborne, Claiborne Gough, eldest son of my sister Ursula Gough, Elizabeth Claiborne, daughter of sister Mary Claiborne. Cousin Leonard Claiborne, cousin Eunice Coalies, friend George Clough. Friends John Waller, Henry Madison and Daniel Miles. Madame Latitia Newell governesss to my daugher, Mary Claiborne." This will is found in "Some wills from the Burned Counties of Virginia and other wills not listed in Virginia Wills and Administrations 1632-1800" by William Lindsay Hopkins, Richmond, Virginia 1987. I think this Mary Claiborne MAY be the one who m. Edward, son of Thomas of Marcy as he was b. in 1690.

Children:

Lt. Col. Thomas CLAIBORNE

Col. William CLAIBORNE

Jane CLAIBORNE

Leonard of Jamaica CLAIBORNE

John of New Kent CLAIBORNE

Claiborne, William (1587?-1677?), American colonist in what is now the state of Maryland. He was born in northwestern England. Claiborne was appointed secretary of state for the colony in 1625.

In 1631 he purchased Kent Island in Chesapeake Bay (now part of Maryland). However, Cecilius Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore, claimed Kent Island as part of the land grant given his family by royal charter. A group of colonists sent by Calvert to the Maryland colony seized Kent Island in 1638. Claiborne overthrew Leonard Calvert, Cecilius Calvert's brother, in 1644 and held Maryland for the next two years.

The English strongman Oliver Cromwell appointed him to a parliamentary commission that governed Maryland from 1652 to 1657. Lord Baltimore's claim to the colony was upheld, however, and Maryland was returned to him." Copywrite Encarta© Online Deluxe

From Johnathan Clayborne on genforum: "William was born in Crayford. He was baptized on Aug 10, 1600. He attended Pembroke College at 16 years of age and was officially admitted on May 31, 1617. On June 13, 1621 he was chosen by the Virginia Company to be the official Surveyor in the colony. He was a member of the party of Sir Francis Wyatt, who was the newly appointed Governor. They arrived in Jamestown in Oct, 1621 aboard the ship "George". On Mar 30, 1623 he was appointed to the Council. He was re-appointed by the King on Aug 26, 1624. From 1625-1635 he served as the secretary of the colony, and again from 1652-1660. During 1642-1660 he also was the colony's treasurer. In 1640 he was given charge of the colony's seal. (This means that he was well liked. :) ). According to documents from 1626 he owned a total of 17,500 acres of land dived among 7 differnt geographic locations. During 1627 William was given a boat and a large company of men and told to scour the (cheseapeke) bay area and look for rivers and creeks. It was during this expedition that he found what is now called Kent Island. On Mar 24, 1630 he went to England. On Mar 16, 1631 William and associates were granted license from the King to to trade with the indians from the island. During his trading he bought the land from the local indians. He built a large fort there complete with cannon, orchards, farms, and houses and housed about 150 men. (nearly half the population of the Colony at the time). On Jun 20, 1632 Leonard Calvert, aka Lord Baltimore, recieved a large grant of land wich included "land not cultivated nor planted". Williams island was within the boundaires of the land, but his fortress even had orchards and farms and was therefore cultivated so it did not fall within the confines of the grant given to lord Baltimore. Baltimore disagreed. The "first naval battle" in american history was fought just off the island. Williams ship "Cockatrice" went up against Baltimore's ships "St. Helen" and "St. Margaret". Williams ship was forced to retreat. A few days later the same ships fought again and the battle ended in Williams favor. They fought back and forth for several years over the island. The King had issued a decree to Calvert that the island was not his territory, but Calvert persisted. Virginias goverenor at the time was Governor Harvey. HE was booted out of Virginia for, among other things, failing to support William and Virginia's prior rights to the island. (The virginians were pretty ticked about lord baltimores grant.) In 1635 William returned to England to ask the King for assistance in controling Calvert. The King refused. It was on this trip that William married Jane Butler. While he was away Calvert launched an assault on the island and took it. Shortly after William returned to Virginia and waited. He built up an army and took the whole of baltimore in 1638. A long-time enemy of the colony returned at the same time and basically assisted William. Once all of Calverts forces were driven from Maryland William returned to Kent Island and his new associate ransacked the mainland plandering anything he wanted. Calvert eventually returned in 1644 and drove them both from Maryland. In 1652 William was made a Parliamentary Commisioner along with Richard Bennett and sent to remove all public officials from office in maryland by order of Parliament. (There was trouble with a religious faction in marland that, left unchecked, would result in small scale war). After the crisis was averted, William and Richard returned the local officials to their proper office. William did not try to re-take Kent Island during this time, although he could have. He sent one last petition to the King in 1676 begging the king to let the "poor old servant of your majesty's father and grandfather" have restitution for the land and properties of the isle. His case was dismissed and he died shortly after. William's well-documented children are: William, Jane, John, Elizabeth, Thomas, Leonard.

I do have a copy of the "Claiborne" coat of arms that Id be happy to give you, but keep in mind that these arms are do not officially belong to William and his family. There was a second William Claiborne that was born in the Yorkshire area at the same time as your william. His family is the one that the coat belongs to."

"The arms Argent 3 chevronnels interlaced in base and a chief sable were officially registered at the Herald's Visitations of the County of Yorkshire in 1584/5 and 1612 for the Cleybourne family of Killerby, who are shown as having derived from the neighboring county of Westmorland. The name is variously spelt as Clyborne, Clyburne, Cleburne and Clebourne in 1584/5 and as Cleybourne, Clayburne and Clyburne in 1612 - but as you probably know, there were no fixed spelling of names in those days, so its not at all unusual to find such variations. The arms consist of a shield only, without a crest, though it includes quartering for the Kirkbride arms as well as the basic Cleybourne coat.

We are not permitted to photostat our official manuscripts but I am able to let you have the enclosed copy of a composite pedigree printed in Joseph Foster's 1875 edition of the two Visitations, which contains all the information given in the manuscript versions. Indeed, it gives slightly more detail in the third and sixth generations: the fact that Thomas Cleybourne was living at Hay Close in Cumberland, the existence of his sister Elizabeth and her marriage to John Thwaites of Marston, Edward Cleburne's marriage to Elizabeth Hutton, and his sisters marriage to Whitfield of Coulton, all these particulars have been drawn from other sources. I should mention that the Edward shown at the foot of the pedigree is Edmund on the Visitation record.

There is no later pedigree or registration of the arms for a family of the name in our records. William Claiborne and his descendants never established any right (page 731) to arms either by descent or by having a new grant. Nor has any crest ever been officially associated with the shield. The crest shown on the seal described in the article you sent with your letter of Jan 3rd must have been informally assumed by the Claibornes in America.

I suspect that their adoption of the shield was also informal. The fact that thier ancestry has been traced back to King's Lynn in Norfolk, the other side of the England from Westmorland, suggests that there was no close link between the families - and perhaps no link at all. I should explain that over all the centuries, indeed throughout the history of heraldry, there has been a tendency for families to adopt coats of arms that belong to other families of the same name, irrespective of any actual relationship. The use of the Visitation family's arms on William Claiborne's seal and on his son Thomas' gravestone cannot in itself be treated as evidence of any actual connection between these families.

This does not entirely rule out the possibility that the Norfolk Claibornes were descended from the Westmorland family but Im afraid that the chances are against discovering thier precise origins. It is very rare indeed to be able to trace the ancestry of an English family prior to the early 16th century. It might be helpful to look at a variety of Norfolk sources to see if the name occurs in that county in the century or so before the lifetime of Thomas Cleybourne. If not, it is plausible that he came from elsewhere, and it would be worth looking at records relating to the Westmorland family in the case there is any reference to him.

However, from what you tell me, it sounds as if a good deal of research has already been carried out in determining Thomas' origins. I enclose a copy of of a page of a page from Walter Rye's "Norfolk Families Vol I (1911)". I have also turned up a number of references to the Westmorland family in printed sources none of these disclose a link with Thomas of King's Lynn.

.

I am afraid that this report is necessarily somewhat negative. I hope nonetheless that my findings are of some interest to you, and I shall be happy to answer any further queries you may have.

Yours sincerely,

[singed] P.L. Dickinson

P.L. Dickinson

Richmond Herald"

CLAIBORNE FAMILY HISTORY

Col. William Claiborne, born 1587, died 1677. He married 1st Jane Butler of London, and married 2nd in Virginia Elizabeth _______________about 1644.

After Col. William Claiborne settled at his plantation, Romancoke, on the Pamunkey (ca1650) he became one of the leading men in the Colony and was named Secretary, and appointed by the King.

His wife, Jane Butler was the daughter of John Butler and Jane Elliott. They had two sons at least, William and Thomas Claiborne; two daughters, Jane Claiborne who married Thomas Brereton and Mary Claiborne who married 1st Edward Rice and after his death she married Robert Harris. Clayton Torrance in his excellent article on the English Ancestry of William Claiborne wrote: "There is no evidence that the Honorable WilliamClaiborne (1600-1677/8) and his wife Elizabeth Butler had other children (at least who survived infancy or childhood) than William, Thomas, Leonard, John, and Jane). Also Mary married 1st Edward Rice and 2nd Col. RobertHarris, 167__.

NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY RECORDS

STATE OF VIRGINIA

Deeds & Orders 1650 ; 1652, pg. 36, William Claiborne 1648

Whereas there are certain debts and other things due to me at Chichecon (i.e. Chicacone) and other places up the Bay. These presents are to appoint and authorize my kinsman Mr. Samuel Smith to ask and receive as also to implead and acquit and compound for any the said debts with any persons inhabitants or beings in the said places and in particularas being guardian unto my two daughters I do hereby authorize the said Samuel Smythe to take all those cattle at Chiceon into his custody fortheir use and to receive a heifer due from the estate of James Cloughton for a bull he killed of theirs witness hereunto my hand and seal this second day of April 1648

_______________________________W. Claiborne

Witness: Christopher Williams _______________________________

On a brass memorial tablet in Cliburn Church, near Penrith, Westmorelandshire, is the following: Insuper at in memoriam Guielmi de Cleyborne primie Secretis Coloniae Virgiiniensis qui anno vixit MDCXXVII

See Virginia Carolorum, pg. 43, by Edward Neill

Later translation: Guielmi (William) de Cleyborne sen. Claiborne primi secretary of the Colony of Virginia 1627.

CLAIBORNE FAMILY HISTORY

Ca 1587 WILLIAM CLAIBORNE (1810) born Westmoreland, England, son of Sir Edward and Grace (Bellingham) Cleburne of Helsington. Thisis disputed, and others, e.g..Boddie, give his birth as later, being baptized10 August 1600, in Parish o__ Crayford, Kent, son of Thomas Cleyborne (ca1557-1607) of Borough of Kings Lynn, (Mayor 1592) and Sarah James (Nee Smyth) widow of Roger. They moved to Parish of Stepney, Middlesex,and then to Parish of Crayford, Kent.

1617 (Boddie) He was student at Pembroke College, Cambridge.

October WILLIAM CLAIBORNE Arrived at Jamestown to assume his appointmentas 1621 surveyor for the Virginia Colony.

March until 1637, and again 1652-1660 WILLIAM CLAIBORNE was Secretaryof State for Virginia. He later became Treasurer and then, Deputy Governor of the colony. He patented ma---- tracts of Land, boughtKent Island from the Indians and became involved in a dispute with Lord Calvert in his establishment, -- the dispute as to whether Kent Island was to be part of Maryland or Virginia lasting until his death. His name is included in many Virginia documents and records and his historyis well worth studying. His portrait is hanging in the State Capitolat Richmond.

Ca 1635 WILLIAM CLAIBORNE (1810) md. ELIZABETH BUTLER 1811; d. ,

dau. of John Butler (3622) and his wife, Jane Elliott (36 )

Ch: 1. William Claiborne d. 1682, m. Eliz. Wilkes., New Kent

2. Thomas Claiborne, b. 17 Aug. 1647; d. 7 October 1683 md. Sarah Fenn.

3. Leonard Claiborne settled in Jamaica where he died 16

4. John Claiborne

5. Jane Claiborne m. bef. May 1661 Col. Thos. Brereton, Northumberland Co.

6. MARY CLAIBORNE md. 1st. Edward Rice

2nd MAJOR ROBERT HARRIS

Ca 1677-68 WILLIAM CLAIBORNE died 1810, probably at New Kent Co. home at Romanoke (now in King Wm. Co.) completing a very eventful life. His wife, Elizabeth (Butler) Claiborne (1811) had lived until at least1668/9.

References

21T245 Article by G.H.S. King

IV316-318

56V442-6 Article by Dr. Clayton Torrance

Virginia Historical Genealogies ; John Bennett Boddie p. 36-38

Claiborne Family of Virginia ; Claiborne 1917

Old Virginia and her Neighbors ; Fiske 2 Vols.

Founders of Maryland , Neill p. 38

The Ligon Family and Connections Wm. D. Ligon __ 1947

Col. & Revolutionary Lineages of America Vol. 4, p. 59-64, Vol.1__

p. 213 , 221

History of Louisa Co., Va., Dr. Malcolm H. Harris p. 348

CLAIBORNE FAMILY HISTORY

Col. William Claiborne, born 1587, died 1677, married 1st Jane Butler of London; married 2nd in Virginia, Elizabeth ___________ about 1644. He settled at his plantation, Romancoke, on the Pamunkey River about 1650. He became one of the leading men in the Colony and became the first Secretary in the Virginia colony, appointed by the King. His first wife, Jane Butler was daughter of John Butler and Jane Elliott.

William Clayborne, Gent. , Recommended as able Surveyors:

On a sallary July 24, 1621

Sir William Harris, 75 lbs.

Sir Arthur Harris ,75 lbs.

Thomas Harris , 25 lbs.

Roger Harris , 68 lbs.

John Harris , 37 lbs.

June 20, 1620 The sums adventured were paid by Sir Thomas Smith, Kut., Treas.

Ref. See pages 203 and 289 of Adv. Of purse and Person

Taken from the Records of the Virginia County, Congressional Library,

Washington, D.C.

Children of the Honorable William Claiborne (1600-1667/8) and his first wife

Elizabeth Butler were William, Thomas, Leonard, John, Jane married Thomas Brererton (Breeton) and Mary who married Robert Harris (Genealogy of the Claiborne Family, pg. 14 for the last marriage.) Ref.: Northumberland County, Virginia Deeds, Orders 1650-1652, pg. 36

William Claiborne 1640 – record states he had two daughters.)

- - -

On a brass memorial tablet in Cliburn Church, near Peurith, Westmorelandshire is the following: (Latin inscription) translated: Gueel M. (William) de Cleyborne senr. Claiborne primi Secretary of the Colony of Virginia 1627 (See ,Virginia Carelerum,pg. 43, by Edward Neill and pg. 155 in MartinFamilies by Wm. Cross, page 155) William Claiborne’s daughter, Mary,lst Edward Rice and 2nd Robert Harris (b. 1635; d. 1701). Her father,Wm. Claiborne was the first Secretary of the Colony of Virginia, appointed by the King.

- - -

Harris Papers by K. Wiggin

Volume 3, page 29:

To the Glory of God and to the honored memory of William Claiborne,son of Edmund Claiborne and Grace Bellingham of Claiborne Hall, Westmoreland County in England was born 1587 and settled in Virginia 1621; Member of the Council 1623-1660; Secretary of State 1625-1635; 1656-1660; Treasurer 1642-1665; deputy Governor 1653; Commander Expedition against the Indians1629 and 1644 at Kent Island. He made the first settlement within the present bounds of Maryland.

Adv. Of Purse and person by Hiden pg. 131 stated William Claiborne was the sone of Thomas Claiborne of Kent County, England and that he was born 1600.

For Additional Data See: Winston of Virginia and Allied Families by Clayton Torrance CS 71 . W782 1927 Complete book on William Claiborne, Secretary of Colony of Virginia and English background; an account of his Pedigree F229, C58; Chapter II page 155

Roots in Virginia by Nathan Claiborne Hale CS 71 #163 pub. 1948 , excellentClaiborne data

CLAIBORNE FAMILY HISTORY

CA1587 WILLIAM CLAIBORNE (1810) born in Westmoreland, England, son of Sir Edward and Grace (Bellingham) Cleburne of Holsington. This is disputed, and others, Boddie, give his birth as later, being baptized10 Aug. 1600, in Parish of Grayford, Kent, son of Thomas Cleybourne (ca1557-1607) of Borough of Kings Lynn, (Mayor 1592) and Sarah James (Nee Smyth) widow of Roger. They moved to Parish of Stepney, Middlesex, and then toParish of Crayford, Kent.

1617 (Boddie) He was student at Pembroke College, Cambridge

October

1621 WILLIAM CLAIBORNE arrived at Jamestown to assume his appointmentas surveyor for the Virginia Colony.

March until 1637, and again 1652 WILLIAM CLAIBORNE was Secretary of State for

1625/26 Virginia. He later became Treasurer and then, DeputyGovernor of the Colony.

He patented many tracts of land, bought Kent island from theIndians and became involved in a dispute with Lord Calvert in his establishmentof Maryland, -- the dispute as to whether Kent Island was to be part of Maryland or of Virginia lasting until his death. His name is included in many Virginia documents and records, and his history is well worth studying. His portrait hangs in the State Capitol of Virginia, at Richmond.

Ca 1635 WILLIAM CLAIBORNE (1810) m. ELIZABETH BUTLER (1811) daughterof John Butler (3622) and his wife, Jane Elliott (3623)

Children: 1. William Claiborne b.__________ d. 1682md. Eliz. Wilkes of

New Kent County, Virginia

2. Thomas Claiborne, b. 17 August 1647, d. 7 October 1683, md.

Sarah Fenn of New Kent County, Virginia.

3. Leonard Claiborne settled in Jamaica where he died in 1694.

4. John Claiborne

5. Jane Claiborne ( ) before May 1661 md. Thomas Brereton,

Northumberland County, Virginia.

6. Mary Claiborne (905) married (1) Edward Rice

(2) Major Robert Harris (904).

Ca 1677-68 WILLIAM CLAIBORNE (1810) died probably at New Kent County home at

Romancoke (now in King William Co.) completing a very eventfullife. His wife,

Elizabeth (Butler) Claiborne (1811) lived until at least 1668/9.

References

21T245 Article by G.H.S. King The Ligon Family and Connect

IV316-318 Wm. D. Ligen,Jr. 1947

56V442-6 Article by Dr. Clayton Torrence

Virginia Historical Genealogies Col. & RevolutionaryLineage of

John Bennett Boddie p. 36-38 America Vol. 4 p. 56-64

Vol. 12, pg. 213-221

Claiborne Family of Virginia - History of Louisa Co., VA.

Claiborne 1917 Malcolm H. Harris p. 348

Old Virginia and her Neighborns ,Fiske

2 Vol. Founders of Maryland ,Neill pg. 38

CLAIBORNE LINE OF DESCENT

William Claiborne

1. Malcolm II King of Scotland, father of:

2. Prince Beatrice married Crinan Lord of the Isles. Their son was:

4. Cospatrick: Earl of Northumberland and Dunbar

5. Lady Gunilda md. Orme, Lord of Slaton

6. Cospatrick 1st lord of Workington d. 1179

7. Thomas De Workington d. 1152

8. Patrick De Curiven: of

3. Maldred, brother of Duncan I , King of Scotland

NOTE: In wrong order ,8 generations removed ,

9. Elizabeth Curwon: md. John Cleburne, of Cleburne Hall, and Bampton in Westmoreland,

d. 1489. From them was descended (6 Generations Removed).

10. Captain William Claiborne of Romancoke, King William County, VA.b. 1597; d. 1676;

md. in 1638, in London, Jane Butler. He settled in Virginia in1621; was Secretary and Treasurer of the Virginia Colony and Surveyor Generalof the Old Dominion

11. Lieutenant Colonel thomas Claiborne of Romancode b. 1647; killed by the Indians in

1683; md. Miss Dandridge of Virginia.

12. Capt. Thomas Claiborne of Sweet Hall born, 1680; King Wm. Co.,VA.; d. 1732 , md. 3 times and had 27 children. By his last wife,Ann Fox who died in 1733, he had:

13. Col. Augustine Claiborne of Windsor, b. 1721; m. Mary, dau. of Buller H. Herbert of Puddlecoke, and had 15 children.

14. Mary Claiborne: b. 1744 md. Gen. Charles Harrison of , Berkley, d. 1796 (an uncle of President Harrison).

15. Mary Herbert Harrison md. Herbert Peterson, of Petersburg,VA.

16. Lucy Ann Peterson md. William H. Young of Virginia.

Ref.: Young Family Records, and Americans of Royal Descent, 1891 , Browning

Seventy Five Years in Old Virginia, New York 1904

,William Claiborne of Virginia, by John Herbert Claiborne of VA,191___

,Virginia Venturer, Biography of William Claiborne ,Richmond 1951by Nathaniel C. Hale.

William Claiborne made settlement on Kent Island in Maryland because of this Wm. Claiborne & the Calverts of Maryland were engaged in the Civil War for many years. He was born in Westmoreland (shire) North England.

Capt. William Claiborne of Romancoke, King William County, Virginia was born 1587; died 1676; married in 1638, in London, Jane Butler. He settled in Virginia in 1621 , was Secretary and Treasurer of the Virginia Colony and Surveyor General of the Old Dominion

Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Claiborne of Romancoke, was born 1647. He was killed by Indians in 1683; married Miss Dandridge of Virginia.

Capt. Thomas Claiborne of Sweet Hill, born 1680 in King William County,Virginia, died 1732; married three times and had 27 children. By last wife, Ann Fox who died in Puddlecoke, and had 15 children.

Mary Claiborne born 1744 married Gen. Charles Harrison of Berkeley and died 1796 (an uncle of President Harrison.

Ref. A book on & William Claiborne of Virginia by John HerbertClaiborne New York 1917. He also wrote Seventy-Five Years in OldVirginia, New York 1904.

Va. Venturer , Biography of Wm. Claiborne, 1951, Richmond by Nath C. Hale

CLAIBORNE

The Will of Richard Claiborne is in Lunenburg County, Will Book 2, p.438: 1776

Richard Claiborne's will was probated in Lunenburg County in 1776. He writes that the tract where he lately lived called Roberts old placeis to be sold and also his rite to the land Samuel Harris now lives on the land being mine at said Harrises death, but in case money is wanting he gives above land to son John Claiborne his riding chair is to be sold; Edward Dudley of Amelia county is to pay his debts and divide the rest between his three sons, John Claiborne, Richard Henry Claiborne and Leonard Claiborne. When Richard Henry is 20, he is to have money from plantation sale of place he now lives near Winningham's, it being north of the River; he gives slaves to his daughter Molly Warwick; to son Leonard the land he now lives on that lies south of the Meherrin River; none of his sons is of age; Leonard is to be under management of Edward Dudley; John and Richard Henry are to be under care of Charles Hamlin senior and William Warwick of North Carrolina; Rev. James Craig is to educate Leonard if Dudley should die; also Charles Hamlin would manage his plantations and negroes in this case; Ann Dudley is given a negro girl; nephew Leonard Claiborne son of Thomas Claiborne deceased is left money; he is at law with Philip Whitehead Claiborne about a sale of negroes Col. Phil Johnston claims as his property; Dudley of Amelia Co. and Warwick of NC his executors; witnesses are Henry Pamplin, Wm. Claiborne, Elizabeth Pamplin and John Salmon.

(The Claibornes were a wide-ranging family and other wills and records of the family appear in other county sections of this notebook.)

Lunenburg County Records

Patents and Grants:

Book 24, p. 547; Augustine Claiborne in 1746 patents 656 acres on both sides of the Meherrin River.

Book 26, p. 355: Samuel Harris in 1748; April 5th, patents land on the south side of the Stanton River at Cargil's line.

p. 357, Samuel Harris patents 252 a. n. side Stanton R. on his own line, same date.

From the notes of Mrs. Anderson. dec'd

Transcribed by Nancy Ridgway

William Claiborne Biography

Source: Biography.com

( c. 1587 – 1677 )

(born c. 1587, Westmorland County, Eng.—died c. 1677, , Virginia [U.S.]) American colonial trader and public official.

Claiborne immigrated to Virginia in 1621 as a surveyor for the colony, and in 1626 he was appointed secretary of state for Virginia and a member of the governor's royal council. The following year he received a license to trade with the Indians along Chesapeake Bay, and after exploring the region, he established a successful trading post on Kent Island in 1631.

Kent Island was included in the proprietorial grant to Lord Baltimore in 1632, despite Claiborne's opposition in London to the grant. When Claiborne resisted Baltimore's claim to the island, the proprietor ordered his governor in Maryland to seize the settlement. Claiborne thereupon sailed to England in 1637, attempting to justify his claim, but the commissioner of plantations ruled against him. Claiborne returned to Virginia, and in 1642 he became treasurer of the colony.

Two years later he and Richard Ingle seized the opportunity to incite a revolt in Maryland that expelled Governor Leonard Calvert, leaving Claiborne in control of the colony until 1646. Five years later he was appointed a member of the commission established by Oliver Cromwell's Parliament to enforce its rule over both Virginia and Maryland. He served as a member of the commission that governed Maryland from 1652 to 1657. Claiborne vainly persisted in his efforts to regain control over Kent Island despite the reestablishment of the Maryland proprietor

William Claiborne

Source: Jamestowne Society Website

William Claiborne, second son of Thomas Clayborne and Sarah James of the parish of Crayford, County Kent in England, was baptized on 10 August 1600 and entered Pembroke College, Cambridge in May 1617 at age 16. In June 1621 he was chosen to be the Surveyor of the Virginia colony under special terms which included the granting of 200acres. Traveling with Sir Francis Wyatt in the George he reached the colony in October 1621.

Surviving the Indian massacre in 1622, by 1623 he was on the council and was laying out the area on Jamestown Island that became known as "New Towne". At the same time he had patented his own 200 acres downriver near Blount Point and the following year 150 more acres at Kecoughtan. Participating in one of the governor's raids to destroy Indian corn, he was wounded in the thigh during the battle.

Completing his three year stint as Surveyor in 1624, he moved to his Kecoughtan land, and in August 1624 as Virginia became a royal colony he was continued as a member of the council.

Diligent, he was also always careful to insure he received all to which he might be entitled, receiving from the council more land, in 1625 250 acres near Archers Hope and in May 1626 500 acres on the Blount Point river. In 1625 he was named Secretary of State for Virginia at 25 years of age. This gave him access to more opportunities and in September 1626 the council awarded Claiborne for three years the sole use of the only Indian who had volunteered to help the colonists.

Claiborne now continued for three years exploratory trading voyages on the Chesapeake meriting the congratulations of the council. In 1629 he commanded a punitive expedition against the Pamunkey Indians for which effort he was reimbursed with 500 pounds of tobacco. In 1631 he established a trading post on Kent Island, and won sole authority to trade with the Susquehannocks.

When in 1629 Lord Baltimore appeared in the Chesapeake obviously looking for land, the council gave Claiborne the task of protecting Virginia's property rights. Successful in London in delaying the incursion, he built up his trading post on Kent Island. However, by 1633 Lord Baltimore had received a grant of Maryland, which included Claiborne's assets on Kent Island. Kent Island had previously been part of Virginia.

St Mary's City was founded in 1634 and Governor Calvert gave the word to Claiborne that he could only stay on Kent Island as a tenant of the proprietary and would need a license to trade. Strains now built in Virginia where the council opposed support for Maryland's settlers while Governor Harvey was eager to furnish assistance. A letter from the king instructed Maryland to allow the Kent Island post to trade and to enjoy the fruits of its labors. This led to a collision involving Maryland's seizing one of Claiborne's boats while then one of Claiborne's boats attacked two of Calvert's leading to four deaths.

Over four subsequent years, the turmoil continued. Claiborne's London partners betrayed him and petitioned Governor Harvey to seize all of Claiborne's assets, then receiving Governor Calvert's ruling that they controlled Kent Island.

Finally in 1638 Calvert led an expedition that seized Kent Island from Claiborne supporters and resulted in hanging a number of them. About the same time a final ruling from the crown settled the dispute for the moment in Baltimore's favor. However, with Governor Harvey's final recall and the installation of Governor Wyatt in 1639, Claiborne recovered much of his Virginia estate and acquired more land, 700 acres near Kecoughtan and 3000 acres in the Northern Neck.

In 1642 he was named by the king Virginia's Treasurer for life. After the 1644 Indian massacre of 400 colonists, when he had been named by the Assembly to be general and chief commander of the colony's forces, he laid waste to the lands and crops of the Chickahominies and then defeated the Pamunkey tribe in a three week campaign.

With the conclusion of the English Civil War, Claiborne in 1652 was one of four commissioners representing the Commonwealth when it peacefully took control of Virginia, and he was named Secretary of State, a position he continued to hold for one year after Charles II was restored. He subsequently traded with the Indians, and lived in the Northern Neck with many Kent Islanders. As land titles there became questionable he moved with many Kent Islanders to his lands on the Pamunkey river where he founded New Kent County and built his home at Romancoke.

He appears once more in the record in March 1677 when he was praised for his loyalty after Bacon's Rebellion. The date of his death is not recorded. He and Elizabeth Boteler were married in 1635, and they had six children.

References:

1. "Claiborne of Virginia", by John Frederick Dorman; Gateway Press, Baltimore, MD, 1995

2. "Virginia Venturer", by Nathaniel C. Hale; The Dietz Press, Richmond, VA, 1951

3 "The English Ancestry of William Claiborne", VA Magazine of History & Biography, 1948

Little Burch Hall - the home of the John Butler/JaneElliott family

and their daughter Elizabeth, who was to marry WilliamClaiborne in

Virginia c1635. This family also included Elizabeth's olderbrothers

John and Thomas Butler who both eventually came to Virginia andsettled

in Claiborne's Kent Island settlement in the upper ChesapeakeBay. The

brother of the senior John Butler was Capt. Nathaniel Butler o fnearby

Roxwell who was to become the Governor of Bermuda from 1619 to1622 and

who later sat on the Council of Virginia with William Claiborne

 

The first record we have of this family is that Capt. Thomas HARRIS and Thomas OSBORNE settled in Virginia in 1611 on lands that are now located in Henrico County. Captain HARRIS in the long Indian Wars of 1622 was second in command to Thomas OSBORNE. He was a member of the House of Burgesses in 1623, 1637, 1647. He m. Adria OSBORNE, and from this marriage descended Maj. Robert HARRIS of ?The Forks? who m. a widow, Mrs. Mary (CLAIBORNE) RICE, youngest dau. of Col. William CLAIBORNE, the first Secretary of the Virginia Colony. Their son WILLIAM HARRIS m. Temperance OVERTON, dau. of William OVERTON, the immigrant, and his wife, Mary WATERS; this William OVERTON was the son of Colonel OVERTON, Governor of Hull, England, under Oliver CROMWELL and later commanded a brigade at Dunbar and Inver Keithing. (See ?HARRIS Family of Virginia,? by Thomas Henry HARRIS of Fredericksburg, Virginia.)

8 May 1626 Court orders a patent of 500a for Mr. William Cleybourne “towards the head of Blunt Poynte River and abuttinge southerly on the land of John Baynum…” {McIlwaine, p103.]

1681, 23 Apr - Nicholas Ware patented 536 acres in New Kent Co., Stratton Major Parish upon Assatiams branches, according to bounds formerly made by Col. William Cleyborne (sic); beg. in Michell's line; adj. John Durwood (sic); Griffin Lewis &c. Trans. of 11 pers. "eleven rights recorded under Jno. Dorwoods (sic) and Nico. Wards (sic) old pattent is good to Richd. Ward and used for this pattent.". Note: This was exactly 10 years after the 1671 patent for 536 acres. (Cavaliers and Pioneers, Patent Book No. 7, Page 218) 1681, 23 Apr - Mr. Mathew Jennings, Chirurion, 760 acres in New Kent Co., in the freshes of Yorke Riv., adj. land Peter Ware bought of Col. William Cleyborne, dec'd; land of Mr. Edward Cardingbrooke; the eastward branch. of Heartquake Swamp; running to head of Hawkesneast Br; land of John James, dec'd, 500 acres whereof granted him by William Berkeley, late Gov, 9 June 1666; and 100 acres being the free gift of Col. William Clayborne, Senr. out of his devdt. purchased of Mr. Frederick Fortson, dec'd; 160 acres purchased of William Henderson, 22 Feb. 1666, for trans. of pers. (Cavaliers and Pioneers, Patent Book 7, Page 218) http://www.claibornesociety.org/home.shtml

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BRIEF BACKGROUND ON WILLIAM CLAIBORNE

Records of the Virginia Company of London

Vol 4, pp 555-558

edited by Susan Myra Kingsbury

published in 1906 by the U.S. Government Printing Office

reprinted in 1994 by Heritage Books Inc., Maryland.

Claiborne's Arrival in Virginia: In November 1620, Claiborne sailed from England aboard the George, as member of the party accompanying Sir Francis Wyatt, newly appointed governor of Virginia. Claiborne was 21 years of age when his ship sailed through the Virginia capes into Chesapeake Bay on August 8, 1621, en route to Jamestown.

Claiborne appointed Virginia Surveyor: Prior to leaving England, the Virginia Company appointed William Claiborne, of Kent County, England, as Surveyor for Virginia. His appointment read as follows:

The Comittee appoynted by the Preparative Courte to treate with Mr. Cleyborne (Commended and proposed for the Surveyors place) haveing mett the next day and takinge into their considerations the allowances that a former Comit tee had thought fit to State that Office withall in respect of the service hee was to per forme as well in generall as particular Surveys did agree for his Salary to allow him Thirty pounds per annum to be paid in two hundred waight of Tobacco or any other valuable Comoditie growinge in that Country and that hee shall have a conveyent howse provided at the CompanieS charge and Twenty pounds in hand to furnish him with Instruments and books fittinge for his Office which hee is to leave to his Successor....

Claibo rne Wounded in Indian Hostilities: In 1624, while serving as Governor Wyatt's military aide in retaliatory raids against the Powhatan Indians (following the 1622 massacre), Claiborne and his company of 60 colonists confronted and defeated an Indian force of some 800 bowmen. None of the colonists were killed but Claiborne was wounded. He would command Virginia forces against the Powhatan Indians in 1644-45, capturing the fabled Chief Opechancanough.

Claiborne Appointed Virginia's Secretary of State: In 1625 William Claiborne was named to Governor's Council and in 1626 was elevated to Virginia's Secretary of State, a post second only to Governor in political influence. Claiborne's appointment read as follows:

And forasmuch as the affairs of the said Colony and Plantation may necessarily require some person of quality and trust to be employed as Secretary for the writing and answering of such letters as shall be from time to time directed or sent from the said Governor and Council of the Colony aforesaid, our will and pleasure is, and we do by these presents nominate and assign you, the said William Clayborne to become Secretary of State, for the said colony and Plantation of Virginia, residing in those parts.

Claiborne served as Secretary until 1637 (again from 1652 to 1660) and was named the colony's treasurer in 1642.

Claiborne Established Trading Post in Hampton: Land patents granted to William Claiborne (Clayborne) in 1625 include 150 acres in "The Corporation of Elizabeth Citty." It was on this land, located near the present Settlers Landing Road that he established the trading post used as a base for fur trading expeditions and explorations in upper Chesapeake Bay. See Records of the Virginia Company of London (Vol 4, pp 555-558), edited by Susan Myra Kingsbury, published in 1906 by the U.S. Government Printing Office and reprinted in 1994 by Heritage Books Inc., Maryland.

Following account re Claiborne's settlement on Hampton site is from Old Kecoughtan (p86), William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, Series 1, Vol. 9, No. 2, 1901:

On the west side of the river lived in these early days that very quaint character in our early history, called William Capp, who resided at "Little England," anciently known as Capps' Point, and who in 1610 represented Kecoughtan in the first American Legislature. Above him, on two tracts of land, together aggregating 150 acres, and separated from Capps by a creek, was the most famous of all the early settlers of this region. This man was the celebrated William Claiborne, surveyor, Treasurer of Virginia and Secretary of State. Here, on the very site of the present Hampton Town, he had his storehouse for trade with the Indians up Chesapeake Bay and elsewhere, and from this storehouse his sloops, loaded with goods in exchange for skins and furs, sailed to many points in Maryland, Nansemond and the Eastern Shore.

Following is from History of Hampton and Elizabeth City County by Lyon G. Tyler, 1922 (pp28-29):

We have seen that.. .Col. Claiborne obtained a patent for 150 acres at the present site of Hampton. In 1680, this land had become the property of a ship captain named Thomas Jarvis.... This same year (1680) the General Assembly passed an act condemning fifty acres, in each of the counties, for towns, to be centers of trade and sole places of import and export. For Elizabeth City, the area selected was a part of Captain Thomas Jarvis' property, which was vested in trustees or feoffees, and divided into half acre lots. The limitations of the act, however, were distasteful to both merchants in England and planters in Virginia, and the act was soon suspended by the government, though several persons bought and built houses at the new town.

In 1691, the act was revived, and the town for Elizabeth City County was decreed to be built on "the west side of Hampton River, on the land of Mr. William Wilson, lately belonging unto Mr. Thomas Jarvis, deceased..." [This land on which the town of Hampton was incorporated in 1691 was the land originally owned by Claiborne and sold by his family to Jarvis in 1680.1

Clai borne Explored Chesapeake Bay: In January 1629, Claiborne was commissioned by Virginia's acting governor, John Pott, to explore the parts and territories of this colony situate and lying to the southwards of this place as also of some particular places to the northward and in the Bay of Chesepeiacke and greatly favoring the prosecution of such enterprises tendeth so much to th eenlargement and welfare of this colony.

Claiborne Discovered Kent Island: During his explorations of upper Chesapeake in 1628, Claiborne had discovered, named, and settled Kent Island (which he bought from the local Indians for 12 pounds sterling). There he built a post from which to conduct fur trading expeditions with Indians. He described his island as follows:

Entered upon the Isle of kent, unplanted by any man. But possessed of the natives of that country, with about one hundred men and there contracted with the natives and bought their right, to hold of the Crown of England, to him and his Company and their heirs, and by force and virtue thereof William Claiborne and his Company stood seized of the said Island. (The actual price that Claiborne paid for Kent Island in 1631 was 12 pounds sterling.

The island was named for his native Kent County, England. He later would apply the name to New Kent County, Virginia.

Claiborne Lost Kent Island to Lord Baltimore: In 1632, Charles I granted Maryland to Sir George Calvert, First Lord Baltimore, but Calvert died before the royal seal was put to the charter. Rights and privileges were inherited by the son, Cecil Calvert, Second Lord Baltimore. Maryland had been carved out of territory included in Virginia's original charter, and it included Claiborne's Kent Island which Lord Baltimore confiscated. This led to a lengthy territorial dispute between Claiborne and the Lords Baltimore-and involved a Chesapeake Bay shooting war which in 1635 would include the first naval engagement in American waters. The dispute would not be resolved until Claiborne's death in 1677.

Claiborne Appointed Parliamentary Commissioner: In October 1650, following the English Civil War in which Charles I was executed, Parliament appointed William Claiborne as one of two commissioners to govern Virginia and Maryland, with authority to reduce those two colonies to the subjection of the English Commonwealth.

Suggested Reading:

Chesapeake Conflict The Troublesome Early Days of Maryland by Gene Williamson, Heritage Books, Inc. 1995 (1-800-398-7709);

We Claim Right of Possession by Gene Williamson, 2000, (great unpublished.com Title No.70);

" Virginia's One-Man War Against Maryland" by Gene Williamson, "Virginia" magazine, Vol.6,no.2 (804-725-7700)

Virginia Venturer, a Historical Biography of William Claiborne, 1600-1677 by Nathaniel C. Hale, Dietz Press, 1951;

The English Ancestry of William Claiborne of Virginia by Clayton Torrence in Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol 56, No. 33-4, 1948;

History of Hampton and Elizabeth City County, Virginia, by Lyon G. Tyler, published by Board of Supervisors of Elizabeth City County, Hampton, Virginia, 1922;

At the request of, and with seed money from the Town Guides of King's Lynn, Norfolk, England, a painting was made of William Claiborne and presented to the mayor of King's Lynn in May 1996. The painting is displayed in the Town Hall where his father and grandfather served as mayor in 1592 and 1573, respectively.

Claiborne Society Projects

Completed Projects

· At the request of, and with seed money from the Town Guides of King's Lynn, Norfolk, England, a painting was made of William Claiborne and presented to the mayor of King's Lynn in May 1996. The painting is displayed in the Town Hall where his father and grandfather served as mayor in 1592 and 1573, respectively.

· William Claiborne Historical Marker was dedicated to the city of Hampton, Virginia on June 8, 1997. William Claiborne once owned the land upon which Hampton was built.

· Acted as advocacy group for the complete archaeological survey of the Pentran Parking Lot in Hampton prior to its paving. The artifacts which were found there will be displayed in the museum in Hampton.

· Acted as advocacy goup for archaeological study of Poplar Island in the Chesapeake Bay prior to the dredging spoils being dumped thereon.

· Supported Cecil Land Trust in archaeological work being done on Palmer's/Garrett Island in the mouth of the Susquehanna River, an early trading post of William Claiborne.

· Transcription of a journal believed to have been written by Dr. Christopher J. Cleborne.

Current Projects

· Trying to locate all known portraits/ paintings of William Claiborne.

· Trying to resolve placement and restoration of life-size painting of William Claiborne currently in storage at the Library of Virginia.

· Repairing/replacing William Claiborne Memorial Plaque in "old church tower" at Jamestown.

JudithTimms126added this on 8 Oct 2011

tambourinejayneoriginally submitted this to Whither I Came and Whither I Goest on 31 Jan 2009

Thomas Claiborne, (the elder), born ca 1525/1531 was Mayor (1573), Justice of the Peace (1574), and Alderman for the Parish of St. Margaret, King’s Lynn Borough, Norfolk, England. A merchant who, on his death, left many bequests to the church and charities, as well as to his children Dorothy, Katherine, and son THOMAS, Jr., who was appointed executor of his estate. He died between December 1581 - when his will was written, and May 1582 - when his will was probated. He stipulated that he desired to be buried "in the parish church of St. Margaret’s in King's Lynn” near the sepulcher of his late wife.

Thomas Claiborne (Jr.) was born ca 1557. He was the Mayor (1592) and Alderman (1591) of the Kings Lynn Borough (Parish of St. Margaret) in Norfolk, England. He married Sara James (nee Smyth), the widow of Roger James, on November 21, 1598 at St. Dunstan's Stepney, Middlesex. Sarah had four children from her first marriage. After their marriage, Sara and Thomas moved to the Parish of Stepney, Middlesex, and finally to the Parish of Crayford in Kent. He was a wealthy merchant, with a business in London in the late 1590’s. I have seen reference to the fact that that Thomas and Sara Claiborne were the owners, among other assets, of The Royal James, a tavern that stood between Shakespeare's Globe Theater and the River Thames. The children of Thomas & Sara Smythe Claiborne were 1) Thomas, 2) WILLIAM, 3) Sara, 4) Katherine, and 5) Blanche. The baptisms of these children were recorded in Crayford Parish. Thomas, III and his wife Jane accompanied his brother when William Claiborne returned to Virginia in May 1631. Thomas and Sara were married not quite 9 years, before his death in Crayford, Kent on Sept. 10, 1607.

Hon./Capt. William Claiborne, born ca 1600, baptized 10 August 1600 in Crayford, son of Thomas & Sara Smyth-James Claiborne. William was our immigrant ancestor. William was admitted to Pembroke College, Cambridge, 31 May 1617 at age 16. On 13 June 1621 he was chosen by the Virginia Company to undertake the task of Surveyor of the Colony, compensated with 200 acres of land in the colony. He arrived at Jamestown in October, 1621 on the ship the George. He laid out the area on Jamestown Island known as New Towne. William would achieve many honors during his lifetime. In 1623 he was appointed to the council, and would serve as the first Secretary of the Colony 1625-35, 1652-60, and Treasurer – appointed for life in this position. He accumulated large tracts of land, including 250 acres at Archer’s Hope (James City); 500 acres at Blount Point (Warwick), 150 acres at Elizabeth City; 5000 acres in Northumerland County; 5000 acres on the Pamunkey; and 1,500 acres on the north wide of the York the River. His plantation in Virginia- was called “Romancoke.” By 1626 he had accumulated a total of 17,500 acres in 7 different locales. In 1631 he settled the Isle of Kent in the Chesapeake Bay and named his plantation there Crayford, becoming the 1st White Settler in what is now known as the State of Maryland He would subsequently lose his land on the Isle of Kent due to political machinations of the Royal Governor. He served courageously as Captain of the colonial troops in their struggles with the Indians.

William married ca 1635 Elizabeth Butler, born ca 1610 in Roxwell, Essex, England. “She was the daughter of John Butler (1585 - ?) and Jane Elliott (abt. 1582 - ?) of Little Burche Hall, Roxwell, Essex, England. Elizabeth's siblings were John Butler of Kent Island, Sara Butler, ? Butler (female), and Thomas Butler, married Joan Mountsteven Butler wife of Nicholas Mountsteven, haberdasher of St. Marins at Ludgate. Elizabeth's uncle was Capt. Nathaniel Butler, Governor of Bermuda.”

William & Elizabeth’s children were 1) Jane, 2) John, 3) THOMAS, 4) William, Jr. “the younger”, and 5) Leonard. William had died by Mar 1677, probably on his plantation, Romancoke.

Comments:
Barbara Bowie-Whitman William Claiborne


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This article is about the English pioneer and surveyor. For William Charles Cole Claiborne (1775–1817), a United States politician, see William C. C. Claiborne.


William Claiborne
Secretary of State for the Virginia Colony


In office
1626–1634
Parliamentary Commissioner and Secretary of the Virginia Colony

In office
1648–1660

Personal details

Born

c. 1600
Crayford, Kent
Died
c. 1677
West Point, Virginia


William Claiborne (c. 1600 – c. 1677)[1] (also spelled William Clayborne) was an English pioneer, surveyor, and an early settler in Virginia and Maryland. Claiborne became a wealthy planter, a trader, and a major figure in the politics of the colony. He was a central figure in the disputes between the colonists of Maryland and of Virginia, partly because of his trading post on Kent Island in the Chesapeake Bay, which provoked the first naval battles in North American waters. Claiborne repeatedly attempted and failed to regain Kent Island, sometimes by force of arms, after its inclusion in the lands that were granted by a royal charter to the Calvert family, thus becoming Maryland.

A Puritan, Claiborne sided with Parliament during the English Civil War and was appointed to a commission charged with subduing and managing the Virginia and Maryland colonies. He played a role in the submission of Virginia to Parliamentary rule in this period. Following the restoration of the English monarchy in 1660, he retired from involvement in the politics of the Virginia colony. He died around 1677 at his plantation, Romancoke, on Virginia's Pamunkey River. According to historian Robert Brenner, "William Claiborne may have been the most consistently influential politician in Virginia throughout the whole of the pre-Restoration period".
one year ago
Barbara Bowie-Whitman William Claiborne, an ancestor of Nancy Melvina Skaggs, was Treasurer, Surveyor General, Deputy Governor and Secretary of the Colony of Virginia, and a member of the Virginia Assembly. His portrait hangs in the Capitol in Richmond.

William Claiborne has a direct line of descent from Malcolm I of Scotland (943-954 AD), according to Earl Davis Smith in" Forebears and Kin of JohnTyson Smith and Nancy Melvina Skaggs", 1972). However, that line of descent is based on Earl Davis Smith's belief that William was the son of Edmund Claiborne and Grace Bellingham, which has come into doubt in recent years. William's wife Elizabeth Boteler (Butler) has a direct line of descent from David I of Scotland (d. 1153 AD), as documented in "The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants ", by Gary Boyd Roberts, 1993, which does NOT show Wlliam Claiborne to be desended from Royalty..
one year ago
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