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Pamela Bate

Gender:Female
Age:60's
Country:
 Australia
Joined:February 5 2011 (3 years ago)
Pamela is an active member of the site Tunnicliff Web Site
Pamela visited 11 times, last visit on November 7 2013 (5 months ago)

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Comments:
Helen Harm Hi Pamela...I am copying this huge amount of data concerning the Lean Family Tree. Hope you get something out of it ...Regards Helen

Descendants of William Lean



Descendants of William Lean

Generation No. 1

1. WILLIAM8 LEAN (GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 16 Nov 1843 in Dungog, NSW, and died 22 Sep 1915 in Fernmount, Bellingen, NSW. He married CHARLOTTE CLEAVER 7 Jan 1870, daughter of JOHN CLEAVER. She was born 1846, and died 21 Aug 1905 in Thora, NSW.

Notes for WILLIAM LEAN:
William, the eldest son was born on 16th November, 1843 and was 12 years of age at the time of death of his father and only 15 when his mother died. After some years helping his Uncle and then on his own farmlet, he married Charlotte Cleaver on 7th January, 1870. Charlotte was the daughter of Dungog pioneers and was born on the ship that brought her parents from Essex to Australia. Born in 1846, she was 23 years old at the time of her marriage in Dungog.

Just 12 months later, their first child William Jnr. was born on 8/1/1870 at Figtree Farm, followed by Amy in 1873, and John Walter in 1874. Tragedy struck the young family when, in 1876, the baby girl, Amy, died of Diptheria.

William and Charlotte sold up their farm, packed their possessions into a wagon and headed north out of Dungog. After some days travelling, they settled at Burrell Creek, a piece of uninspiring land on the southern side of the Manning River between Gloucester and Taree. It was there that their fourth child, another daughter, Charlotte Mabel, was born in 1878.

At this time there was taking place a general thrust of population to the newly opened rivers of the North Coast. Tales were coming south of highly fertile alluvial river land on the Hastings, Macleay and Bellinger Rivers and the large tracts of land to the North of the "Big River" - the Clarence, as well as the Big Scrub lands of the Richmond/Tweed Basin.

The cedar getters were full of stories of the gigantic softwoods that grew in the area as well as the heavy rainfall - so different to the dry lands to the South.

The Beatties, Camerons, McLennons and Cleavers were all settled around Taree Estate and Kimbriki, near Burrell Creek, and it is interesting to conjecture whether by common agreement, many members elected to make the push northward along the Coast. By the time they reached the Bellinger, settlement had taken place along the river Westward about 13 miles from the village of Weekes (later to become Fernmount).

William pressed westward and subsequently selected an area of approx. 700 acres in 1879, extending from the foothills of the Dorrigo Plateau, across the alluvial river flats and into a well watered valley bounded by the Scotchman Range. The land cost one Pound Stg. per acre. He returned to Burrell Creek and wrote the following letter to his brother Thomas in Dungog.

He returned to Burrell Creek and wrote the following letter to his brother Thomas in Dungog.

March 6th (1880)
Burril Creek.

Mr. T. Lean.

Dear Brother,

After a long silence I take up my pen to write you a few lines. I heard the other day that you were thinking of leaving the Williams (Fosterton). Dear Brother, perhaps you are getting like me almost tired of rent paying.

Well I heard a great deal about the Bellinger River lately. One would tell one yarn and another would spin another. At last I made up my mind to go and see for myself, and have purchased 140 acres, and I think there is 60 or 70 acres of real good ground on it. (Ed. Note - Most probably the main homestead block - portion 12).

There is a very nice farm close to mine, there is about 30 acres of first class land on it. I don't know exactly how much there is of it altogether. The price is 100 Pounds, and there are other places, but the only way to do is to come and see for yourself, if you intend to leave where you are, a trip to the Bellinger would not be much and you might get a place that would suit you very well.

I intend trying to sell out the crop and everything as it stands if I can do that I will bundle the old woman and kids in the bullock dray and off to the Bellinger in two or three weeks.

Dear Brother, it is no use being afraid. If we want a home we must push out, and the sooner the better, for land is getting dearer and rents are rising every year.

If you write soon you might direct to Burril Creek, but you might be too much offended to write to me, if so I cannot help it but I would be very sorry.

I will now conclude, hoping this will find your dear wife and children happy and well, as it us all at present.

I remain your loving Brother.

William Lean

Write soon, Goodbye.

He and Charlotte commenced the back-breaking task of building a home at the 12 mile peg, and clearing the standing scrub. The procedure was to ring bark the large forest trees and to grub and burn the underbrush. Grass seed was sown into the ashes of the burn. Slashing and brushing of the re-growth was a continuous process, and it is only in recent years, almost a century later, that the remains of some of the "forest giants" have been burned away.

Some years later, the old home was extended by the addition of three bedrooms opened by French doors. The spacious kitchen was ultimately the only remainder of the "old house" until it too was pulled down in the 1960's, and much later in the 70's replaced with a new bathroom/laundry block, following the architectural lines of the original structure.

Apart from dairying and maize production, William established the "Never Never Butchery" in the early 1880's.

A report of William and Charlotte's 25th wedding anniversary on 7th January 1895 in the Raleigh Sun (11/1/1895) is reproduced below as an insight into the life and times of that era.

The Celebrations

Mr. and Mrs. W. Lean at Home.

There's nothing half so sweet in life as love's young dream! In contemplating life, with the vicissitudes and experiences there is no record that is more pleasing than to see a "happy wedded pair" who have trod the road together, hand in hand and heart to heart, and of whom it can be said, after 25 years of married life that they still appear as faithful and true lovers - albeit there are "silver threads amongst the gold" - as on the day they were first mated.

Twenty five years ago last Monday (on the 7th January 1870) a wedding took place at Dungog, on the Williams River, the contracting parties being Mr. William Lean, a native of the Williams, and Miss Cleaver, daughter of one of the pioneers of that district. Miss Cleaver, however, could claim old England as her birthplace. The Rev. K.A. Corner (Wesleyan) was the officiating minister, and the happy young couple began their career on a property on the Williams River, where they continued to reside for some years, when they removed to the Manning and later on - in May 1879 - came to the Bellinger, and Mr. Lean purchased a farm at Never Never, which was the scene of a most fitting celebration of the silver wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Lean on Tuesday last.

The idea of entertaining Mr. and Mrs. Lean on the occasion was mooted amongst their neighbours some months ago, and was taken up heartily by all, the result being that the ladies in the district clubbed together, formed a committee for the purpose, and sent out invitations broadcast to the numerous friends of the popular old residents to attend a picnic on Tuesday January 8 - a day after the anniversary of the event to be celebrated, but the natal day of Mr. William Lean, Jun., the eldest son who was born on January 8, 1871, a year and a day after the marriage.

The result was that from an early hour on Tuesday morning, notwithstanding a threatening sky, the road from Bellingen to Never Never presented an unusually lively appearance - buggies galore and equestrians in large numbers proceeding to the scene of the celebrations, which were conducted at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Lean.

Arrived there we found upwards of 200 people, from all parts of the district assembled. Bellingen, Fern Mount, South Arm, North Arm, the Dorrigo, the Nambucca, in fact every locality within a day's ride was represented; all met to assist in the celebration and to wish Mr. and Mrs. Lean many more happy years and that they might be spared to celebrate their Golden Wedding. There were old and young present - friends of many years standing. There were pretty girls and jolly girls all natural and homely, and their presence did much to dissipate the gloom that a clouded sky and occasional shower threatened. The matrons at Never Never turned out in full force, and proved their capabilities as housewives by the spread that was presented and the management that prevailed throughout. We can honestly compliment the ladies of that locality upon not only their excellent cooking, but also upon the variety and taste displayed in the preparation of the banquet. In all our experience we have never seen such a large supply so well prepared, and when a move was made to the luncheon booth the visitors showed their appreciation by keeping the ladies who waited, with cheerful kindness, constantly on the go. The quantity of tea consumed was only equalled by the disappearance of poultry, ham, sandwiches, cakes, pudding, fruit etc., which were all thoroughly enjoyed.

After luncheon a cricket match was started, married v. single, but owing to rain during the afternoon it could not be finished, the married men having nine wickets down for 44 when the stumps were drawn. The beautifully grassed paddock was well suited for the games, and the young ladies and single gentlemen had a very merry time, a little mud being regarded as harmless. The more staid of the party looked on or assisted in clearing up after the luncheon and later on prepared a bounteous spread in the barn, out of the wet. The boys also indulged in cricket, and rounders, hop-scotch, and such like games went on merrily. During the day Mr. and Mrs. Lean had a time before them in hand shaking, and a record of genuine good wishes on the Bellinger was established.

A number of friends made presents to the happy couple, who must verily have felt that this was another wedding day in calm, middle life. Reminiscences of their early courtship no doubt brought some of those bright smiles to their faces, and the presence of their children and their one grandchild added an additional pride to the occasion. Their two sons (the elder of whom is married, and has one daughter) and their only surviving daughter are fine specimens of native growth and appear to have inherited the same open, kindly and hospitable disposition so conspicuous in their parents, and which traits have led to Mr. and Mrs. Lean being universally beloved and so widely known and appreciated.

After another regal spread in the afternoon some of the visitors returned to their homes, but the great majority remained to take part in the dance at night, at which many fresh faces appeared. Before the dance, however, the Bellingen Minstrels gave an entertainment which was gone through most creditably and created much fun. Fully 150 persons were present at the ball and, the music being good and the dancers capable, the Mazes of the Waltz were never better enjoyed. We will not attempt to name a belle where so many shone to advantage nor did they cease the pleasures of the ball until daylight warned them that another day had dawned.

During the night Mr. Boultwood, on behalf of the visitors, thanked the ladies for the princely manner they had entertained, and speaking for all, wished Mr. and Mrs. Lean many more years of happiness and that they would celebrate their Golden Wedding under as happy auspices and still in good health. Cheers were then given for Mr. and Mrs. Lean, for the ladies who had catered and entertained them and for the members of the Christy Minstrel Club.

The following ladies comprised the committee, and by the quantity and excellence of the provisions, proved that they foresaw what a large gathering there would be. Some certainly worked harder than others, and the ladies who waited at the picnic and ball had no light task, and they did all so cheerfully, that it was at once apparent that it was a labour of love they were engaged in - Mesdames Hickey, A. Beattie, W.H. Washington, T. Rose, G. Rose, W. Boyter. H. Renwick, D. McGregor, W. Lean Jnr., B. Joyce, G. Joyce, A. Faichney, Anderson, R. Lavender, J. Renwick, Jay Gordon, and last but not least Misses Simpson and Renwick. A number of other ladies who had received invitations, also contributed liberally.

Although the weather was not favourable everything passed off with enthusiasm, and an era was passed which will remain in the recollections of Mr. and Mrs. Lean and their family while they live. Their home is beautifully situated and the surroundings are those of a really well conducted farm. A glance at the home life there discloses the beauty, the peace and the real happiness that is to be found in the rural districts when all pull together. Would that the homes of more of our settlers were like that of the couple entertained. Their peace, love and happiness abound - the best guides to good, the noblest ambition that man can aim to. We trust Mr. and Mrs. Lean may be spared to celebrate many more anniversaries of their marriage, and that the example set by them will be followed by others who took part in the proceedings on Tuesday last."

That the home of William and Charlotte continued to be the focus of social and sporting activities in the small community at Never Never is witnessed by the following report printed in the "Raleigh Sun", Friday 25th May, 1900.

"Social at Never Never

A very pleasant social took place at the residence of Mr. W. Lean, J.P. at Never Never on Thursday evening of last week, a number of friends of Mr. and Mrs. Lean being invited to celebrate the completion of their new residence. Owing to the unsettled state of the weather, the attendance was not as large as expected, but those who were present enjoyed themselves thoroughly, dancing, singing and indoor games being indulged in until morning. Mr. Donald McGregor efficiently carried out the duties of M.C. and excellent music was supplied by Messrs. A. and J. Anderson (accordion) and Misses Watt and Beattie and Mr. J. Richardson (piano). A substantial supper was provided about 7pm and refreshments were again served at midnight and at 4am, before the guests dispersed.

Mr. W.M. Jay, in a short appropriate little speech, proposed a hearty vote of thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Lean for their hospitality. Mr. A. Tyson supported the proposition. Hearty cheers were given and the singing of "He's a Jolly Good Fellow' terminated one of the most enjoyable evenings spent at Never Never for some time."

William was a quiet, God fearing man and Charlotte a very much home loving person. Their farm was the cross roads of much of the local activity, serving as the local Post Office, and serving as a staging point for travellers further up the river and onto the Dorrigo Plateau.

Charlotte died at Thora on 21.8.1905, aged 59 and her death was reported in the "Raleigh Sun" on 18th August of that year, as follows:

"It is with deepest feelings of sorrow that we have to record the death of Mrs. Lean, wife of Mr. W. Lean Sen. J.P. of Never Never which sad event took place on Tuesday night, the cause of death being pneumonia.

The deceased lady was 61 years of age and had resided at Never Never ever since she left the Manning some 26 years ago. She leaves a sorrowing husband and two sons and one daughter, Mr. W. Lean Jun. of Gleniffer, Mr. Walter Lean, Never Never, and Mrs. Algie of Cobargo, who arrived home to see her mother a couple of days before her death.

The late Mrs. Lean was a daughter of the late Mr. John Cleaver of the Manning River, sister of Mr. W. Cleaver and Mrs. D. McLennon both of the Manning, and Mrs. D. Lee of Port Macquarie and Mrs. Greenslade of South Australia. The deceased lady will be mourned by all who knew her.

Most of her life had been spent in caring for others, and working for any charitable cause, whatever creed or clan, and our local Hospital has lost a worker who will be hard to replace. Prior to her illness, she had started collecting for the Hospital Ball for which she was selected on the committee. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr. J.S. White, who left Never Never for Fernmount Cemetery on Thursday morning, when a large number of mourners followed the remains to the grave. The deceased belonged to the Methodist Church, but in the absence of the Rev. W.H. Jones, the funeral service was conducted by the Rev. W. Ferries. We extend to the mourning husband and relations our heartfelt sympathy in their sad bereavement."

Life, however, went on and a few months later, the same newspaper reported the formation of the first Progress Association in the District.

Raleigh Sun 17/11/1900

"A public meeting was held at Mr. W. Lean's residence on Wednesday evening November 1st, for the purpose of forming a Progress Committee for that district. Although attendances were small, those present decided to form themselves into a committee. Mr. W. Lean J.P. (President); Mr. G. Joyce and Mr. A. Anderson (Vice Presidents); Mr. J.W. Cleaver (Secretary and Treasurer).

Agreed to approach the local member in order to urge the Department to carry out the deviation at the Church Hall near Meyers Crossing, also to write to the Dorrigo Progress Committee asking for their assistance. Also agreed to draw up a petition for a bi-weekly mail service up the river as far as H. McGregors."

William survived his wife for another 10 years and continued to live on his farm with his son John Walter and later, with his daughter in law, Elizabeth, until his death on 22nd September. 1915 when he was buried with Charlotte at the Fernmount Cemetery.


More About CHARLOTTE CLEAVER:
Cause of Death: Pneumonia

Children of WILLIAM LEAN and CHARLOTTE CLEAVER are:
2. i. WILLIAM9 LEAN, b. 8 Jan 1871, Forsterton, NSW.
ii. AMY LEAN, b. 1873, Dungog, NSW; d. 5 Jan 1876, Dungog, NSW.

More About AMY LEAN:
Cause of Death: Diptheria

3. iii. JOHN WALTER LEAN, b. 1874; d. 1939, Bellingen, NSW.
4. iv. CHARLOTTE MABEL LEAN, b. 28 Jul 1878, Burrell Creek, NSW; d. 26 Oct 1947, Sydney, NSW.


Generation No. 2

2. WILLIAM9 LEAN (WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 8 Jan 1871 in Forsterton, NSW. He married CATHERINE MCFADYEN.

Notes for WILLIAM LEAN:
The eldest child of William and Charlotte, William was born at Fosterton on 8 January, 1871 and was 9 years old when his parents arrived at Thora. Both he and his younger brother were put to work at an early age alongside their father in clearing the land, and later both became very active sportsmen. Cricket was a favourite sport, and it is only in recent years that the old concrete cricket pitch was pulled out of the House paddock. William subsequently married Miss Catherine McFadyen, the daughter of a pioneering Gleniffer family, and built a house on the opposite side of the road to the entrance to his parents' property.

Some years later, William and his young family moved on to Gleniffer, between Gordonville and the Promised land, where they established a farming property near the land owned by Catherine's family.


Children of WILLIAM LEAN and CATHERINE MCFADYEN are:
5. i. EVELINE MARY10 LEAN, b. 1894, Thora, NSW; d. 19 Jul 1978, Sydney, NSW.
ii. BERNICE LEAN, b. 1896, Thora, NSW; d. 21 Nov 1980; m. MR. LAMBERT.
iii. IRENE LEAN, b. 1898; d. 1970.
6. iv. RICHARD LEAN, b. 2 Jan 1899, Thora, NSW.
7. v. WILLIAM F ALLEN LEAN, b. 1902; d. 1951, Bellingen, NSW.

3. JOHN WALTER9 LEAN (WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 1874, and died 1939 in Bellingen, NSW. He married (1) STELLA HALLETT. He married (2) ELIZABETH BEATTIE 1907, daughter of ARCHIBALD BEATTIE. She died 13 Mar 1914.

Notes for JOHN WALTER LEAN:
John Walter, the second son of William and Charlotte, was born at Dungog in 1874 and was about two years old when his family moved out of Dungog to Burrell Creek, on their way North. As a young man he worked side by side with his father and brother in clearing the new lands at Thora, and after his brother moved over to Gleniffer, took over most of the work himself.

After Charlotte's death on 15th August, 1905, William and Walter lived together until Walter married Miss Elizabeth Beattie in 1907.

Elizabeth was one of ten daughters of Archibald Beattie of Rawdon Island (Hastings River) and used to travel over to Thora to keep house for her brother, Thomas A. Beattie, a good friend of Walters.

Some nine years after their marriage tragedy struck when Elizabeth suffered a burst appendix. The river was in flood, and she was unable to reach hospital. Peritonitis set in and she died on 13th March, 1914, leaving two small sons.

The two children were taken into the care of Elizabeth's mother and sisters, and Walter was left alone with his father again. A year later, on 22nd September, 1915, William died at the age of 71.

Walter carried on alone for many years, and remarried in 1922, to a Miss Stella Hallett. He died in Bellingen in 1939, at the age of 65 years.

During the Depression years, it became necessary to sell off part of the property surrounding the original homestead. It passed through three ownerships over the next three decades before being brought back into the family in 1972.


More About ELIZABETH BEATTIE:
Cause of Death: Burst appendix, peritonitis.

Children of JOHN LEAN and ELIZABETH BEATTIE are:
i. WILLIAM10 LEAN, b. 1909.

Notes for WILLIAM LEAN:
The first son, was born in 1909 and was five years old when his mother died. He was placed in the care of his mother's family on Rawdon Island, and as a young man joined the Bank at Wauchope. He died at the age of 25 years, in 1934, of Tuberculosis.

More About WILLIAM LEAN:
Cause of Death: Tuberculosis

8. ii. GEORGE BEATTIE LEAN, b. 14 Jan 1913.

4. CHARLOTTE MABEL9 LEAN (WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 28 Jul 1878 in Burrell Creek, NSW, and died 26 Oct 1947 in Sydney, NSW. She married JOHN MALCOLM ALGIE 30 Jun 1897. He was born Abt. 1868, and died 27 Feb 1957 in Sydney, NSW.

Notes for CHARLOTTE MABEL LEAN:
The third (surviving) child of William and Charlotte. May was born at Burrell Creek on 28th July, 1878, after her parents had left Dungog and before they had travelled north to the Bellinger.

Notes for JOHN MALCOLM ALGIE:
John Malcolm Algie was one of the first, if not the first, schoolteacher at Never Never (Thora) and held that position for some years.

As a further insight into the life and times of the District, we reproduce below an account from the Raleigh Sun 20/7/1894, of the farewell picnic given to Mr. Algie upon his departure to another teaching position at Cobargo in southern N.S.W.

May was only a young girl of 16 when her future husband left the district and he returned some years later to wed her.

PICNIC AT NEVER NEVER

The picnic held on Wednesday the 4th instant at Never Never, in consequence of the departure of Mr. J.M. Algie, teacher of the public school there - and which took the form of a farewell, and an evidence of his popularity - was a great success. Fully 170 attended, and these represented all parts of the Bellinger, from the Heads to the upper end of the river. The morning was rather unfavourable, on account of the cold, but at noon the sun shone out warmly and was gladly welcomed by everyone. At 10 am the guests began to assemble, and continued to do so till noon, by which time the green sward began to look alive. The spread was laid out on the grass, and looked such as never was seen before on the Bellinger. There was a great assortment of all kinds of pastry and sweets, and the manner in which they were displayed showed a taste and delicacy rarely to be met with in country places. After a few games had been indulged in dinner was called, and grace having been sung, ample justice was done to the many excellent things provided. All then repaired to the green to indulge in the many games of the day. Teams were picked, and good cricket was played by some, while others amused themselves in various ways, and all went as merry as a wedding day party till nearly 4pm, when tea was again spread, and those who had long distances to travel were invited to sit first.

At the conclusion of the tea, Mr. J.H. Noble J.P. addressed a few words in honour and praise of Mr. Algie, and also of the ladies who had been the instigation of such a lovely day's enjoyment. He said that from that day he would look upon Never Never as a historical place, for never had he seen a more splendid spread, or enjoyed himself better. He said that as Mr. Algie was a deserving young man he was sure all would fall in with him in wishing Mr. Algie every success in his new home.

The Rev. C.G.A. Monro followed and spoke at some length. He said he had not known Mr. Algie for long, but that his acquaintance with him had been of a highly pleasing nature, and few had extended to him the same sympathy and kindness as Mr. Algie had. He could not help noticing too, the order and attention of the children in the school under his charge and in all points they showed signs of painstaking and careful instruction. Mr. Algie had endeared himself to all the residents of Never Never; he had worked hard to organise the cricket club, and had made himself as useful as possible during his stay amongst them. He felt sure all would join with him in wishing Mr. Algie God speed in his new field of labour.

The Rev. A. Palmer next addressed a few words to those assembled and endorsed the remarks of the last speaker, referring very kindly in praise of Mr. Algie. He also spoke of the splendid spread before them, and called for a vote of thanks to the ladies who had provided it, which was carried with hearty acclamation.

Mr. J.F. Donnelly spoke feelingly in testimony of Mr. Algie's many good qualities. He also mentioned the great assistance that gentleman had been to the church, ever since his arrival amongst them, in conducting the singing etc. and concluded by asking the company to give three cheers for Mr. Algie, an invitation responded to with enthusiasm.

Mr. Algie, in responding, said he did not think words could convey his feelings toward those assembled. He could only say he thanked them sincerely for the hearty cheers, and for the many kind things said in honour of him. He felt as one of themselves from the fact that he had been for over two years with them, and he did not think he deserved all the kind things spoken of him. He had not come in hostile contact with anyone during his stay amongst them, and he received the sympathy of the parents in his schoolwork. He had worked conscientiously in endeavouring to instructing the children, and was pleased to say that he had never heard anything but what was very gratifying to him. The unfavourable weather at times interfered with the progress of the school but he had tried to give the children such an education as would make them better citizens, and which would be of most use to them in life. There were two things that helped very much to make a teacher's "all", they were: The hospitality and sympathy extended to him by the parents and others, and the endeavour to get the children on both for their benefit and his own; and he might say that one part he fully received by the kindness and hospitality shown him by Mr. and Mrs. Lean and family. He was sure such kindness was hardly to be expected from anyone, and he desired to publicly thank Mr. and Mrs. Lean for their very great hospitality. He again thanked all for being present, and also those who had promoted such a pleasant meeting.

The gathering began to disperse, after unanimously agreeing that the day had proved a most enjoyable one.

The names of the ladies who had kindly promoted the picnic and who brought it to such a successful issue are: Mesdames J. Hickey, W. Lean, G. Joyce, B. Joyce, G.A. Anderson, D. McGregor, H. Renwick, W. Boyter, T. Rose, W. Lean Jrn., W. Washington, and Misses Renwick and Simpson."


Children of CHARLOTTE LEAN and JOHN ALGIE are:
9. i. MABEL CHARLOTTE10 ALGIE, b. Apr 1898, Cobargo, NSW; d. 1980.
10. ii. JACK ALGIE, b. 1900.
iii. ALMA ALGIE, b. 1903; d. 1960.
11. iv. ALEXANDER ALGIE, b. 1913.


Generation No. 3

5. EVELINE MARY10 LEAN (WILLIAM9, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 1894 in Thora, NSW, and died 19 Jul 1978 in Sydney, NSW. She married BILL BYASS.

Children of EVELINE LEAN and BILL BYASS are:
12. i. IVY11 BYASS, b. 1911.
13. ii. ARNOLD BYASS, b. 1915.
iii. RITA BYASS, m. R HUMPHRIES.

6. RICHARD10 LEAN (WILLIAM9, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 2 Jan 1899 in Thora, NSW. He married VERA BUSSELL 14 Jan 1927.

Notes for RICHARD LEAN:
Richard was born at Thora on 2nd January 1899, and as a young man, dairy farmed with his father. He was a very active sportsman and regularly played football and cricket with Bellingen District teams. He continued dairy farming for some years after his father's death, and after the War, moved to Newcastle, where he resided at South Cardiff until his death on 10th September, 1980.

Dick was a very active co-researcher in the history of the Lean family and the provider of much of this material of his own family. He married Miss Vera Bussell on 14th January, 1927, and they had four children.


Children of RICHARD LEAN and VERA BUSSELL are:
14. i. RICHARD11 LEAN, b. 1928.
ii. RONALD LEAN, b. 1931; d. 1933.
15. iii. DAWN LEAN, b. 1930.
16. iv. ROBERT LEAN, b. 1936.

7. WILLIAM F ALLEN10 LEAN (WILLIAM9, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 1902, and died 1951 in Bellingen, NSW.

Child of WILLIAM F ALLEN LEAN is:
17. i. WILLIAM11 LEAN, b. 1926.

8. GEORGE BEATTIE10 LEAN (JOHN WALTER9, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 14 Jan 1913. He married OLWEN HEATHER AYLING 31 Dec 1935.

Notes for GEORGE BEATTIE LEAN:
Born 14th January 1913, the second son of Walter and Elizabeth, was only a year old when his mother died. George was placed in the care of his Maternal Grandmother and lived for various periods with his many Aunts, his mother's sisters. He was educated at Fort Street High School and University of Sydney, graduating in 1934 (B.Ec.).

Joining H.B. Allard Way and Hardie in 1929, he remained with them until 1936, when he commenced his own practice as a Chartered Accountant. His practice covered many areas, extending from wartime shipbuilding and munitions development and the subsequent development of the Eden Fisherman's Co-operative and A.E. Goodwin to the later secretarial services of a large number of small mining companies.

He was the Founding Secretary of a small Northern Territory Copper mine, Peko (Tennant Creek) Gold Mines N.L. in 1948, which in 1960, merged with Wallsend Holdings and Investment Co. Ltd. to become Peko Wallsend Ltd. of which he became Executive Director (1960 - 1974); Chief Executive (1974) and Chairman (1979); from which position he retired in 1982, remaining a Director of the Company and its various affiliates. He was Foundation Chairman of the Rutile and Zircon Development Association (1967-69).

Mining Industry Member of the SIM Committee of Enquiry on differences and conflicts between interests of Parks and Conservation Authorities, Scientific Bodies, and Mining Companies.

Director - Australian Mining Industry Council.
Director - Australian Korean Business Co-operation Committee.
Member of Council - Bismuth Institute.
Member - Australia Japan Business Co-operation Committee.
Member - Pacific Basin Economic Council.
Member of Council - International House University of Sydney.
Member of Council - Trade Development Council.

He was awarded, on 26th November 1984, by His Excellency the Ambassador of France, the distinction of OFFICER de la LEGION d'HONNEUR, by a decision of the President of France.

This is the most prestigious of the French honorific distinctions and has been awarded to only four other Australians since 1940. The citation said, in part:-

"Mr. Lean was the inaugural President of the Australia--France Industrial Roundtable (AFIR) and the French honour was for his contribution to the development of French-Australian economic co-operation, and his continuing interest in French technology.

Mr. Lean took a leading role in the establishment of AFIR whose aims include the development of mutual Australian-French trade in the larger economic sphere, and in particular with its counterpart in France, the Conseil Nationale du Patronat Francais."

With his son, has been responsible for the rebuilding of the Lean property at Thora on the Bellinger River over the past thirty years.


Children of GEORGE LEAN and OLWEN AYLING are:
18. i. JOHN RUSSELL11 LEAN, b. 4 Oct 1936.
ii. JANET ELIZABETH LEAN, b. 28 Apr 1938.

Notes for JANET ELIZABETH LEAN:
Born 28th April, 1938 -completed B.A. at Sydney University and became a schoolteacher at Frensham School Mittagong. Travelled overseas and taught in England for some years. Returned to Sydney in 1962 and joined the teaching staff of S.C.E.G.G.S., Darlinghurst. Completed M.A. studies and appointed Deputy Headmistress S.C.E.G.G.S.9 Darlinghurst in 1979. Not married.

19. iii. ESTHER MARGARET LEAN, b. 6 Dec 1942.

9. MABEL CHARLOTTE10 ALGIE (CHARLOTTE MABEL9 LEAN, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born Apr 1898 in Cobargo, NSW, and died 1980. She married MR. LALOR.

Children of MABEL ALGIE and MR. LALOR are:
20. i. DONALD KEITH11 LALOR, b. 1929.
21. ii. JILL ILMA LALOR, b. 1935.
iii. JOHN LALOR.

10. JACK10 ALGIE (CHARLOTTE MABEL9 LEAN, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 1900. He married (1) UNKNOWN. He married (2) UNKNOWN.

Children of JACK ALGIE and UNKNOWN are:
i. PORTIA11 ALGIE.
ii. JOHN ALGIE.
iii. DAVID ALGIE.
iv. BARBARA ALGIE.

Children of JACK ALGIE and UNKNOWN are:
v. YVONNE11 ALGIE.
vi. STEVEN ALGIE.

11. ALEXANDER10 ALGIE (CHARLOTTE MABEL9 LEAN, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 1913.

Children of ALEXANDER ALGIE are:
i. ELIZABETH11 ALGIE.
ii. ROSS ALGIE.
iii. ROBERTA ALGIE.


Generation No. 4

12. IVY11 BYASS (EVELINE MARY10 LEAN, WILLIAM9, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 1911.

Children of IVY BYASS are:
i. GILBERT12 BYASS, b. 1930.
ii. YVONNE BYASS, b. 1933.

13. ARNOLD11 BYASS (EVELINE MARY10 LEAN, WILLIAM9, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 1915.

Children of ARNOLD BYASS are:
i. ROBYN12 BYASS, b. 1948.
ii. BRUCE BYASS, b. 1950.
iii. CAROL BYASS, b. 1952.
iv. RICHARD BYASS, b. 1954.
v. LESLIE BYASS, b. 1956.

14. RICHARD11 LEAN (RICHARD10, WILLIAM9, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 1928.

Children of RICHARD LEAN are:
i. MELISSA12 LEAN, b. 1963.
ii. NATALIE LEAN, b. 1967.

15. DAWN11 LEAN (RICHARD10, WILLIAM9, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 1930. She married R WEBB.

Child of DAWN LEAN and R WEBB is:
i. JUDITH12 WEBB, b. 1955.

16. ROBERT11 LEAN (RICHARD10, WILLIAM9, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 1936.

Children of ROBERT LEAN are:
i. CHRISTINE12 LEAN, b. 1957.
ii. LYNETTE LEAN, b. 1958.
iii. KATHERINE LEAN, b. 1962.

17. WILLIAM11 LEAN (WILLIAM F ALLEN10, WILLIAM9, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 1926.

Children of WILLIAM LEAN are:
i. IAN12 LEAN, b. 1953.
ii. GEOFFREY LEAN, b. 1955.

18. JOHN RUSSELL11 LEAN (GEORGE BEATTIE10, JOHN WALTER9, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 4 Oct 1936. He married ELIZABETH RAYMOND 24 Jan 1959. She was born in Bellingen, NSW.

Notes for JOHN RUSSELL LEAN:
Born 4th October, 1936, studied agriculture at Hawkesbury Agricultural College 1953-1955 (H.D.A.) and returned to the family property at Thora where he carried out the initial development work for a number of years.

Returned to Sydney and completed a Part Time University Degree (B.Ec.) and combined a commercial career (Administration--Marketing) with agricultural activities. With his father, George Beattie, has rebuilt the Thora property into a beef cattle operation, including a Poll Hereford Stud.


Children of JOHN LEAN and ELIZABETH RAYMOND are:
i. CATHERINE12 LEAN, b. 1 Jan 1960; m. PETER DUNSTAN.

Notes for CATHERINE LEAN:
Graduated B.E.(Mech.) 1984 the second female ever to have graduated in this course at Sydney University.

ii. DAVID JOHN LEAN, b. 5 Sep 1961.
iii. NAOMI ELIZABETH LEAN, b. 31 Jul 1965.

19. ESTHER MARGARET11 LEAN (GEORGE BEATTIE10, JOHN WALTER9, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 6 Dec 1942. She married ALAN JOHN RUSSELL.

Notes for ESTHER MARGARET LEAN:
Born 6th December, 1942, educated at S.C.C.E.G.G.S. Redlands and completed Nursing Certificate at Royal North Shore Hospital and later worked in the Office of the Minister for Housing.

Children of ESTHER LEAN and ALAN RUSSELL are:
i. TIMOTHY DAVID12 RUSSELL, b. 19 Nov 1969.
ii. CHRISTOPHER ALAN RUSSELL, b. 9 Jul 1972.
iii. ANTHONY GEORGE RUSSELL, b. 21 Apr 1976.

20. DONALD KEITH11 LALOR (MABEL CHARLOTTE10 ALGIE, CHARLOTTE MABEL9 LEAN, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 1929.

Children of DONALD KEITH LALOR are:
i. RHONDA12 LALOR.
ii. WAYNE LALOR.
iii. BRIAN LALOR.

21. JILL ILMA11 LALOR (MABEL CHARLOTTE10 ALGIE, CHARLOTTE MABEL9 LEAN, WILLIAM8, GEORGE7, RICHARD6, ROBERT5, CHRISTOPHER4, ROBERTUS3 LEANE, LEWES2, HENRICUS1) was born 1935. She married MR MILBURN.

Children of JILL LALOR and MR MILBURN are:
i. DAVID JOHN12 MILBURN, b. 1960.
ii. MARK RICHARD MILBURN, b. 1963.
iii. MICHAEL PAUL MILBURN, b. 1967.
iv. DAMIEN RHYS MILBURN, b. 1971.
v. JOANNE MAREE MILBURN, b. 1976.
Contributed by: Bob Brown

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© 2007 BelliGenWeb
152 days ago
Pamela Bate Thank you so much Helen for all this information.
Regards
Pam
150 days ago
Pamela Bate The stories were wonderful to read
150 days ago
 
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