MacTavish Clan Surname DNA Project

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Member Count: 70
Surnames
Cash, Cavis, Cavish, Holmes, Kash, MacCaish, MacCamish, MacCash, MacCavish, MacComb, MacCombie, MacComich, MacComish, MacCosh, MacElhose, MacIltavish, MacLawes, MacLaws, MacLehose, Macomie, Mactavis, MacTavish, MacTeague, McTavish, M'tavish (including the Manx form Kewish), Stephens, Stephenson, Stevens, Stevenson, Tavish, Tawes, Tawesson, Tawis, Teague, Thom, Thomas, Thomason, Thomasson, Thompson, Thomson, Tod, Todd...etc and variant forms of these names.
Description
This project is exploring the genealogy and genetic inter-relationships for families who are associated with the Ancient Scottish Highland Clan known as MacTavish. This Clan and its "Septs" (associated families) were historically first seated at Dunardry, near Knapdale, Argyllshire, western Scottish highlands, having migrated from Donegal, Ireland. The clan's families spread over a large area of Scotland, and later into England and Wales. Many families emigrated to Canada, the United States, Australia, New Zealand and elsewhere, some returning to Ireland, so the diaspora is potentially widespread. In old, as well as more modern times, families have joined the Clan. Some of these families may have taken the names of the Clan as a family surname, and as this is the case in many clans, Male DNA (Y-DNA) may not match other members with a similar or the same surname.
Background
Welcome to the Clan MacTavish and associated families DNA project.  Clan MacTavish is an Ancient Scottish Highland Clan with its historic seat at Dunardry, in North Knapdale, Argyllshire, on the west coast of the Scottish Highlands. The Clan had, and has today, many associated families with surnames including MacTavish, McTavish, Tavish, Tawes, Thompson, Thomson, Stephenson, Stevenson, Cash, Todd, Holmes, and other variants of these.  See www.clanmactavish.org for more possible name variants and further information.  Families associated with Clan MacTavish are known to have emigrated to Canada, the United States, Australia, and elsewhere.  This project, started October 2011 is designed to help current and potential members of Clan MacTavish make family connections and study genetic interrelationships.

Modals carried to 25 Alleles (Repeat Chromosomal positions):
The following are considered "Scots" MODALS beginning with the repeat pattern of 13-24-14-10, but they do diverge. This seems to indicated that the Picts (called Cruithne in Ireland) and Scots were related.
The second modal, R1bSTR47Scots, otherwise R1b-Pict or the Pictish Cluster is considered a Pictish (or Cruithne) Modal.


R1bSTR43

13

24

14

10

11

14

12

12

12

13

13

29

17

9

10

11

11

25

15

19

30

15

15

16

17

R1bSTR47Scots

13

24

14

10

11

14

12

12

12

13

13

30

18

9

10

11

11

25

15

19

30

15

15

17

17



Y-DNA matching to surnames other than your own.

Even though Y-DNA follows the direct male line, yourreported Y-DNA matches may link you to someone with a different surname. If yourY-DNA markers (beginning with a 12 marker match) closely match a person with adifferent surname, and your genealogy does not include an adoption(someone outside your family) or an extra marital event (often referred to as anon-paternity event), then the match may be the result of the following:

1.      You are related before the establishment of surnames. People often tookthe designation (or surname) of their local leader or Chief of the Clan wherethey lived. In the Scottish Highlands, before the establishment of surnames (aboutthe 15the to 18th century), the Chiefs followed the pattern of usingtheir founding ancestor’s patronymic, or even their grandfather’s name. and anyonewho came under their influence would use their chief’s designation. This was sofor many generations before surnames came into use, so the practice was longlived and relatively unchanged into modern times. Your ancestor would say “I am(his name) from (his chief’s designation or territory)”, or something similar.After the establishment of surnames, people generally adopted the name of theirlocal, laird, leader or chief. Within Clan MacTavish, however, the use of “Tavis”as the base name has existed since the 14th century, which is an exceptionallyrare example of surname commonality. The use of Tavis however, predates theestablishment of the MacTavishes in Scotland. The old Gaelic form ofthe name is seen very early in Donegal, Ireland as well(See Irish Names and Surnames by Fr. Patrick Woulfe, and IrishPedigrees, or The Origin and Stem of the Irish Nation, by John O’Hart.),as many Scottish surnames are derived from the Old Irish language.

            (See: Scotland’sPeople website:  http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/Content/Help/index.aspx?r=551&560for a full explanation.

               1.a. Youmay find that you have a match to a MacGregor, a MacPhail, or even someonenamed Walker.In such a case, this could well be an instance before surnames came into use,and your different surname match indicates that the match’s family took thatsurname for one reason or another.

             1.b.You have a match to an Anglicized (Englished) version of a Gaelic surname: Thismay indicate that an ancestor changed the spelling to a more gentrified versionof the name. For MacTavishes this began about the 15th century (veryearly for MacTavishes considering that true surname establishment actuallyoccurred later), when Tomson/Thomson variations came into use.

Alsosee: http://www.familytreedna.com/faq/answers.aspx?id=9#908

Goals
The goals of this project are to encourage the discovery of family relationships within members of Clan MacTavish, to assist Clan members and the public who may be related, and thus potential members, with genealogy studies, and to explore the interrelationships among the family surnames associated with Clan MacTavish historically and in modern times.
News
April 2013 - We have recently had matches among members of Clan Clan MacTavish including Thompson matches to MacTavish, and Thompson matches to other Thompsons. We have also had matches within the Stevens, Stephenson or Stevenson surname with a MacSteaphan ancestor, and also the surname Holmes.

April 2013 - Haplogroups-subgroups of members were updated.
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